Week of November 12, 2012

Hunting & Shooting Products/Issues
National

Regional

General
Lake Erie
Lake Ontaio

Illinois
Michigan
New York
Ohio
Wisconsin
Other Breaking News Items

 

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       New Product  Archives

Hunting & Shooting Products/Issues

ATK launches enhanced Law Enforcement Website

ATK has débuted of its newly redesigned law enforcement website – www.le.atk.com. The enhanced website provides users with a dynamic and streamlined experience when searching for information on ATK’s leading law enforcement brands. The new website is divided into easy-to-navigate categories, and an improved search function allows users to quickly find the latest products from Federal Premium Law Enforcement Ammunition, Speer LE, Force on Force and BLACKHAWK!.

Developed to provide law enforcement personnel with a complete online experience, the new website offers information over a wide range of interests. Whether looking to compare ballistic data, watch helpful videos, or research real-world scenario training opportunities, the redesigned website offers timely information on each of ATK’s premier law enforcement brands.

 

For more info:  http://ow.atk.com/p/ATK/436.aspx


Federal Premium New Trophy Copper Slug

Slug hunters have a new option when hitting the deer woods.

Trophy Copper Sabot Slug is an all-copper slug that incorporates the most advanced technology in the industry. It successfully achieves better accuracy, less drop, manageable recoil and consistent penetration and expansion. Slug hunters have a new option when hitting the deer woods.

 

Trophy Copper Sabot Slug is an all-copper slug that incorporates the most advanced technology in the industry. It successfully achieves better accuracy, less drop, manageable recoil and consistent penetration and expansion.

 

While the competition focuses on one aspect - accuracy, bullet drop,

recoil or terminal performance - Trophy Copper is the complete sabot slug system.

 

Features Include:

Achieves accuracy unequaled in the category
Flat shooting, less slug drop at longer distances

Consistent penetration and expansion across a broad velocity range
Manageable recoil

Load No

Ga

Lgth

Slug wt

 P151 TC

12

3

11/16

 P152 TC

12

2 3/4

11/16

 P208 TC

20

2 3/4

5/8

 P209 TC

20

3

5/8

 

www.federalpremium.com/


National

Do your part! Help pass the Sportsmen’s Act of 2012

Urge your Senators to vote YES for this historic package of fishing legislation

As an angler this is the most important legislative action you can take all year

In the next few days, your U.S. Senators are expected to vote on the most comprehensive package of sportsmen’s legislation in recent years. Introduced on September 10, 2012, the Sportsmen’s Act of 2012 (S. 3525) includes 15 bills that will benefit the sportfishing community, as well as recreational shooters and hunters.

 

This historic legislation provides for increased access, habitat conservation and improved fish and wildlife management, and includes industry's top legislative priority, the Hunting, Fishing and Recreational Shooting Protection Act (S. 838) that would clarify that ammunitionis excluded from regulation by the Environmental Protection Agency under the Toxic Substances Control Act.

 

With a possible vote within days it is crucial you send a message to your Senator today.

 

Individual provisions included in this bill that are important to the sportfishing community are: The Hunting, Fishing and Recreational Shooting Protection Act, the National Fish Habitat Conservation Act, and Making Public Land Public Act.

From improving habitat conservation to increasing public access to protecting the use of traditional fishing tackle, this bill would have monumental impacts on anglers and hunters and maintain our conservation heritage. Please voice your support now for this monumental bill!   

 

Click here to send your message today! 

 

 


U.N. celebrates Obama Re-election
by pushing global gun control

BELLEVUE, WA - Less than 24 hours after winning re-election, President Barack Obama's administration joined with China, France, Germany and the United Kingdom, and more than 150 other governments, in supporting renewed debate on the proposed United Nations Arms Trade Treaty, confirming the worst fears of the American gun rights community.

The vote came at the U.N. General Assembly's meeting of the First Committee on Disarmament at the world organization's headquarters in New York City.

"It's obvious that our warnings over the past several months have been true," said Alan Gottlieb, founder and executive vice president of the Second Amendment Foundation. "The election was called about 11 p.m. Tuesday and by 11 a.m. this morning, we got word that the United States

was supporting this resolution. We have to be more vigilant in our efforts
to stop this proposed treaty."

 

SAF Operations Director Julianne Versnel, who has been back and forth to the United Nations over this proposal, said the fight is not finished. The measure will be considered for finalization in March 2013.  "We will continue to monitor this issue and oppose any effort to enforce a global gun control measure," she stated. 

 

"The right of self-defense is a human right," Gottlieb countered, "and in this country, the Second Amendment protects that right.  "Just days ago as he campaigned for re-election," he concluded, "Barack Obama told his supporters that voting is the best revenge.' I guess now we know what he was talking about. The revenge he seeks is against American gun owners and their Second Amendment rights."


After Obama win, U.S. backs new U.N. arms treaty talks

UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) - Hours after U.S. President Barack Obama was re-elected, the United States backed a U.N. committee's call on Wednesday to renew debate over a draft international treaty to regulate the $70 billion global conventional arms trade.

 

U.N. delegates and gun control activists have complained that talks collapsed in July largely because Obama feared attacks from Republican rival Mitt Romney if his administration was seen as supporting the pact, a charge Washington denies. 

 

The month-long talks at U.N. headquarters broke off after the United States - along with Russia and other major arms producers - said it had problems with the draft treaty and asked for more time.  But the U.N. General Assembly's disarmament committee moved quickly after Obama's win to approve a resolution calling for a new round of talks March 18-28. It passed with 157 votes in favor, none against and 18 abstentions.

 

U.N. diplomats said the vote had been expected before Tuesday's U.S. presidential election but was delayed due to Superstorm Sandy, which caused a three-day closure of the United Nations last week. 

 

An official at the U.S. mission said Washington's objectives have not changed. "We seek a treaty that contributes to international security by fighting illicit arms trafficking and proliferation, protects the sovereign right of states to conduct legitimate arms trade, and meets the concerns that we have been articulating throughout," the official said. "We will not accept any treaty that infringes on the constitutional rights of our citizens to bear arms," he said.

 

U.S. officials have acknowledged privately that the treaty under discussion would have no effect on domestic gun sales and ownership because it would apply only to exports.  The main reason the arms trade talks are taking place at all is that the United States - the world's biggest arms trader accounting for more than 40 percent of global conventional arms

transfers - reversed U.S. policy on the issue after Obama was first elected

and decided in 2009 to support a treaty.

 

Countries that abstained included Russia, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Sudan, Belarus, Cuba and Iran. China, a major arms producer that has traditionally abstained, voted in favor.  Among the top six arms-exporting nations, Russia cast the only abstention. Britain, France and Germany joined China and the United States in support of the resolution.  The measure now goes to the 193-nation General Assembly for a formal vote. It is expected to pass.

 

The resolution said countries are "determined to build on the progress made to date towards the adoption of a strong, balanced and effective Arms Trade Treaty."  Jeff Abramson, director of Control Arms, a coalition of advocacy groups, urged states to agree on stringent provisions.

"In Syria, we have seen the death toll rise well over 30,000, with weapons and ammunition pouring in the country for months now," he said. "We need a treaty that will set tough rules to control the arms trade - that will save lives and truly make the world a better place."

 

Brian Wood of Amnesty International said: "After today's resounding vote, if the larger arms trading countries show real political will in the negotiations, we're only months away from securing a new global deal that has the potential to stop weapons reaching those who seriously abuse human rights."

 

The treaty would require states to make respecting human rights a criterion for allowing arms exports.  Britain's U.N. mission said on its Twitter feed it hoped that the March negotiations would yield the final text of a treaty. Such a pact would then need to be ratified by the individual signatories before it could enter into force.

 

The National Rifle Association strongly opposes the arms treaty.  The United States has denied it sought to delay negotiations for political reasons, saying it had genuine problems with the draft as written.


Regional

Weekly Great Lakes Water Levels for November 9, 2012 

WEATHER CONDITIONS

Dry and unseasonably cool weather was the trend in the Great Lakes basin to begin the month of November. The greatest precipitation amounts fell on the Lake Ontario basin, but only totaled less than a quarter of an inch. A forecasted warm front will bring precipitation with it as the Veterans Day weekend begins. The greatest chance for significant precipitation will occur in the Lake Superior basin and upper Lake Michigan-Huron basins. An expected return to cooler temperatures to start the new week brings a possibility of showers across the southern lakes.

LAKE LEVEL CONDITIONS

The water level of Lake Superior is 4 inches lower than its level of one year ago, while Lake Michigan-Huron is 16 inches lower than its level from last year. Lakes St. Clair, Erie, and Ontario are 11, 12, and 12 inches, respectively, lower than their levels of a year ago. Over the next month, Lake Superior and Lake Michigan-Huron are each forecasted to drop 2 inches from their current levels, while the water levels of lakes St. Clair and Erie are expected to fall 4 and 2 inches, respectively. Lake Ontario is predicted to rise 2 inches over the next thirty days.

FORECASTED MONTHLY OUTFLOWS/CHANNEL CONDITIONS

Lake Superior's outflow through the St. Marys River is projected to be below average for the month of November. Lake Huron's outflow into the

St. Clair River and the outflow from Lake St. Clair into the Detroit River are also expected to be below average throughout the month of November. Lake Erie's outflow through the Niagara River and the outflow of Lake Ontario into the St. Lawrence River are predicted to be below average in November.

ALERTS

Lake Superior and Lake Michigan-Huron are below chart datum. Users of the Great Lakes, connecting channels and St. Lawrence River should keep informed of current conditions before undertaking any activities that could be affected by changing water levels. Mariners should utilize navigation charts and refer to current water level readings.

 

Superior

Mich-Huron

St. Clair

Erie

Ontario

Level for Nov 9

600.7

576.4

572.9

570.4

243.7

Datum, in ft

601.1

577.5

572.3

569.2

243.3

Diff in inches

-5

-13

+7

+14

+5

Diff last month

-2

-2

+2

+1

-3

Diff from last yr

-4

-16

-11

-12

-12


General

Maximize Your Panfish Bite

By Nathan Shore

The depth finder reveals a pair of big crappies under the hole. Anxious to get the bait back down there, you let the spoon fall right to them…and they disappear.

 

It happens all the time. Dropping jigs and spoons too fast can spook bluegills, crappies, perch and other panfish. Using aggressive colors and tactics can spook ‘em, too. We sometimes forget we’re sitting only a few feet over their heads, giving panfish every excuse to be skittish. Standing up, sitting down, scraping buckets on the ice, hovering over the hole, then allowing light to stream down there in a big beam – it’s amazing we catch any at all.

But it’s something we have no control over that costs us the most – fishing pressure. We all know lakes that get “pounded.” Those places train panfish to develop slow and cautious reactions. The bigger a bluegill or crappie becomes, the more jigs and jigging motions it sees. They got big by being more cautious than other competitors. Those specimens tend to be taken only by the most patient competitors on top of the ice, the ones willing to slow down with packages harder for panfish to see.

 

On the other hand, when panfish are tightly packed, feeding competitively, and being suicidal—best to get down quick with a flashy spoon or brightly-colored jig-plastic combo (who needs bait when they’re biting the first thing that moves?). To catch more panfish in any given situation, tune into their mood first. Then tune everything else to match it.

 

Tuning In

The weight, size, and color of a jig or spoon can be subtle or aggressive. A heavy jig is aggressive because it falls fast.  A light one is subtle because it falls slower. A wide, flat spoon or jig is aggressive because it swims, flutters, and sends flash in all directions. A more compact version that fishes heavy for its size can be more subtle because it has no action until you make it move.

 

Bright, gaudy, fluorescent and glow colors are aggressive. Panfish in an aggressive, feeding mood will see them from farther away and be drawn to them. Earth tones like black, gray, brown, motor oil, smoke, pumpkinseed, watermelon and green pumpkin are subtle. They blend in, making it harder for panfish to see them. If we took a poll, we’d probably discover that most anglers think dull colors are less effective for panfish than bright chartreuse or glow orange. As a coverall statement, nothing could be farther from the truth.

 

Panfish can see microscopic things that you can’t. In many ways, their vision is better than yours. They train those eyes to find dull brown and olive green things all the time. A jig, spoon, or plastic trailer that blends in becomes a source of intrigue. As you jig, it appears then disappears. What was that? Arousing curiosity has the effect of stirring predatory instincts, nudging a wary, less active panfish toward a more active state.

 

Notice the word “natural” is avoided to describe those colors. Natural colorations of some insects, larvae, and nymphs can be yellow, bright green, flame red, or pure white. A metallic green jig with a chartreuse trailer can be more natural than we might suppose, while a dark color might be the most visible of all as it silhouettes against the ice.

 

Any selection of jigs and spoons should allow you to tune those variables of weight, shape, and color to match moods of the fish. For instance, the Lindy Bug comes in two sizes. Both are panfish sizes and each size has 10 color options. The smaller version, with a size #14 hook, in one of the natural patterns, like Coach Dog (black on top fading to charcoal on the belly) will “hide” in most light conditions. Its edges fade into the background, appealing to neutral fish. The larger size #12 version in chartreuse—pink glow appears twice as big and is easily seen from twice the distance, appealing to active fish.

 

The Lindy Toad offers the same lineup of sizes and colors in a “bottom-pounding” jig, a weight-forward design that magically retains horizontal balance. With most of the weight in front, it delivers a stronger “punch” when dropped into bottom sediments than any other jig its size, creating a puffy cloud that can alternately hide then reveal the jig, inspiring those hunting instincts in wary, pressured fish. In this case, you’re fine tuning with shape not only to create a different profile, but to facilitate a different function.

 

Another Lindy product—the new Foo Flyer Jig—has a flattened, horizontal-disc shape. The Lindy Jig and Toad can be fished in a subtle manner. Not the Foo Flyer. This jig is designed to “fly,” covering water outside the diameter of the hole, sending flash in more directions. Even a low-energy lift-drop sends it swimming, making it a great search tool. The Foo Flyer is one of the best tools in your box when panfish are in the mood to chase.

 

The Foo Flyer almost has the ability of a spoon to attract, but not quite. When panfish are scattered and feeding off bottom, few things draw them in from farther away than a Lindy Frostee or Lindy Rattl’N Flyer. The surface of a spoon is always perpendicular to bottom, directing flash parallel or almost parallel to bottom—out into the murky distance you’re trying to pull panfish through. In stained or murky water, the Rattl’N Flyer adds noise—another aggressive characteristic that appeals to aggressive fish, as will the faster drop speed.

 

But even in dark water, blending in isn’t always a sin. The idea is to match size, color, and drop speed to the moods of the fish. The quickest way to determine those variables is with the help of plastic trailers, which can be changed quickly to play with color. Shapes can be changed to alter drop speed. Size and profile can be altered the same way, or by trimming plastic to make it smaller. All of that considered, one of the coolest things on ice for fine-tuning presentation is the Lindy Ice Jig. Each jig is packaged with 4 different, 1-inch plastic shapes in a color matching the head.

 

The Lindy Ice Jig comes in nine different colors, including black, white purple, and cranberry, which are neutral, non-aggressive shades. It also comes in chartreuse, bubble gum, and various Techni-Glo shades—aggressive, “look at me” colors that appeal to active, tightly-grouped bluegills, crappies, and perch. Best of all, quick experimentation with drop speed, color, size, and shape eventually brings more panfish in for a look, where you can gauge their moods by their reactions to things.

 

Shy, wary, spooky fish back off from aggressive jigging, colors, and fast drop speeds. Active, competitively feeding fish swim right up and nail a bright jig or spoon being snapped around. With all available information gathered on their state of mind, simply select the tool in your box that best matches that mood. A simple system  that puts more fish on the ice every day.

 


Access remains chief concern among Hunters

When asked in a HunterSurvey.com poll if access to any of the places they tried to hunt in the past year had been restricted or placed off limits to them, nearly 23 percent of hunters said it had. When compared to the previous year’s results to the same question, hunters who lost land access grew by less than one percent, a statistically insignificant bump, but their numbers still reveal that nearly one in four sportsmen nationwide are potentially affected by losing access to available hunting land.

 

“Finding a place to hunt remains one of the biggest challenges to hunters and hunter recruitment” claimed Rob Southwick, president of Southwick Associates, which helps companies and conservation leaders make

better decisions through their research. “As available lands for hunting diminish or change ownership, some hunters will inevitably grow frustrated and pursue other activities.”

 

Indeed, more than half (52 percent) of those respondents who admitted to losing access to a hunting location said their time spent hunting last year was reduced as a result—a seven percent increase over the previous year—while 11 percent said the lost land kept them from hunting altogether. Only seven percent of those respondents said they acquired access to another property where they were able to hunt more than planned.


Lake Ontario

Deepwater Cisco reintroduction in Lake Ontario

Action Is the First of Its Kind in the Great Lakes

The U.S. Geological Survey, USFWS, Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources (OMNR) and the Great Lakes Fishery Commission joined the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) to re-introduce the “bloater” fish, a deepwater cisco, into Lake Ontario offshore of Oswego.

 

Deepwater ciscoes, a diverse group of species including bloater, kiyi, blackfin cisco, and shortnose cisco, were once the most abundant prey fish in the lake and supported important commercial fisheries.  Members

of the whitefish family, bloaters feed primarily on invertebrates in water depths from 180 feet to 650 feet, spawning in winter at great depth, and were an important food source for native lake trout and burbot.

 

Remarks were given on November 8 by Steven LaPan (Section Head, Great Lakes Fisheries; DEC Bureau of Fisheries),  various elected officials,  DEC Regional Director Kenneth Lynch,  Mark Holey, USFWS Region 3 (Project Leader, Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office),  David Bornholdt, U.S. Geological Survey (Deputy Regional Director for Science, Midwest Region) and Gary Isbell, Great Lakes Fishery Commission (Senior Fisheries Manager).


Lake Erie

OH-DNR, USFWS stock surplus Lake Trout in Lake Erie

COLUMBUS, OH - The Ohio DNR has joined forces with the USFWS to implement a pilot project to continue the restoration of native lake trout populations in Lake Erie.

 

Lake trout are listed as a species of concern in Ohio because the population was greatly reduced by sea lamprey predation, particularly in Lake Erie’s eastern basin. There has been very little lake trout natural reproduction documented in Lake Erie over the last three decades, despite extensive annual stocking by neighboring state agencies in the eastern basin.

 

During the week of Nov. 5, approximately 120,000 surplus lake trout fingerlings were stocked in Ohio waters of Lake Erie, including the central basin (Fairport Harbor) and western basin (Catawba). These surplus lake trout were raised at the newly-renovated Service Allegheny Fish Hatchery in Warren, Pa. Approximately 200,000 lake trout are raised annually at the Service’s hatchery facility for lake trout restoration efforts in Lake Erie’s eastern region.

 

Lake trout stocked in November have adipose fin clips and a small, coded

wire tag implanted in their snouts. Specific lot numbers on the tags allow biologists to recover stocking, growth, survival and migration return information when the fish is recaptured.

 

To determine stocking success, ODNR Division of Wildlife fish biologists will collect lake trout catch information and fish heads from anglers, commercial fishers and future assessment surveys. Future reef assessment surveys will determine if adult lake trout are homing in to stocking locations to spawn. Restoring lake trout as a key predator in the coldwater regions of Lake Erie will help maintain a healthy, balanced ecosystem.

 

The Service’s mission is to work with others to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife and plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.

 

ODNR ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR website at www.ohiodnr.com.

 


Illinois

Youth Goose Hunt

Registration deadline Dec 7

Interested youth can register now for the 13th annual Central Illinois Youth Goose Hunt sponsored by the IDNR on Dec. 26-27 at private waterfowl hunting clubs in Peoria, Fulton and Knox counties. Youth hunters must phone in to 217-785-8060 to register for a drawing to participate in the hunt.  The registration deadline is Friday, Dec. 7. 

 

The drawing will be conducted on Dec. 10 and youth hunters selected will be notified by mail.  First-time applicants will be given a priority over

previous participants in the drawing.  The hunt is open to youngsters ages 10-15 at the time of the hunt.  All applicants must have successfully completed a hunter safety education course, possess a valid Illinois hunting or sportsman's license, have a Harvest Information Program (HIP) registration number, and have a 20-gauge or larger shotgun.

 

Youth hunt participants must be accompanied by a parent or guardian who must possess a valid firearm owner's identification (FOID) card.  To register for the hunt or for more information, call 217-785-8060.


Online Free Site Hunting Permits

Hunters are reminded that Free Site Hunting Permits (windshield cards) to hunt upland, forest game and waterfowl at IDNR sites are available online from the IDNR website at www.dnr.illinois.gov.  Click on ‘Hunting/Trapping’

and then ‘Public Hunting Areas’ to print these permits.  Hunters are encouraged to view the link to hunter fact sheets also available at the site. For information or assistance, hunters should contact the site where they intend to hunt.


Spring Youth Turkey

Spring Youth Turkey Special Hunt Area online permit applications will be accepted online from Jan. 15, 2013-Feb. 18, 2013.  For more information on 2013 spring turkey hunting:

http://www.dnr.illinois.gov/hunting/turkey/Pages/SpringTurkeyHunting.aspx

Spring Youth Turkey Season County Permits will be available over-the-counter from IDNR license/permit vendors beginning on March 5, 2013.


Michigan

Ludington Fishery Workshop

Registration Now Open:

Last year’s workshop focused on options for reducing lakewide predation on forage fish in Lake Michigan. At this year’s workshop, Jay Wesley of MDNR will discuss the final lakewide plan to reduce predation and present a port-by-port overview for stocking reductions in Michigan waters.

Other topics will include the Lake Michigan forage base, a new study of the Great Lakes charter fishing industry, and the Great Lakes Observing System, which develops products and online tools for mariners, researchers and anglers.

WHEN: 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

Saturday, Jan. 12, 2013

 

WHERE:
Comfort Inn & Suites
7576 S. Pere Marquette Hwy
Pentwater, MI 49449

Registration is required. The workshop is free, but there will be a $10/person charge for lunch provided by Subway and Comfort Inn. Cash or credit for lunch will only be accepted at the door.

Click for more information or to register (PDF).


New York

Recovery effort returns rare Gilt Darter to Allegheny River

Release of state‑endangered fish aims to boost population

In a collaborative effort to restore Gilt Darter populations in the Allegheny River Watershed, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and partners today released approximately 1,200 Gilt Darter (Percina evides) juveniles into the Allegheny River and Oswayo Creek in Cattaraugus County in western New York.

 

“Today’s effort is a positive step forward in restoring this species to its historic range, as well as increasing the diversity of our aquatic ecosystems,” said DEC Commissioner Joe Martens.  “This stocking event represents a milestone in the recovery of Gilt Darters in New York and culminates years of collaborative fishery restoration efforts.”  

 

“One of the Service’s goals is to work toward fully functional and sustainable landscapes,” said David Stilwell of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. “This multi-agency effort to re-introduce gilt darters to the Allegheny River in New York brings us one step closer to restoring the natural heritage of this wonderful river.  We look forward to working together in partnership on future projects in the Allegheny watershed.”

               

“SUNY Cobleskill faculty, staff and students are all very proud of our contribution to this collaborative effort to conserve and restore the Allegheny River ecosystem,” said Dr. John Foster, Professor and Chair of the Fisheries and Wildlife Department at SUNY Cobleskill.  “This challenging and important project has provided a broad spectrum of opportunities for SUNY Cobleskill’s Fisheries & Aquaculture students to learn from and work with fisheries biologists from the NYSDEC, PA Fish & Boat Commission and Conservation Fisheries Incorporated.”

     

According to John Arway, Executive Director of the PA Fish & Boat Commission (PFBC), “The inter-state cooperation in fisheries science and management supporting this project has been exceptional and should advance the recovery of the gilt darter and other rare species in the region.  These efforts exemplify the “Resource First” philosophy of the PFBC’s mission and we are pleased to have contributed.” 

Classified by New York State as an endangered fish species, the Gilt Darter has been identified as a priority species for recovery efforts. Today’s release marks the first time that Gilt Darters have been stocked in New York waters, and represents a five-year cooperative restoration effort between US Fish and Wildlife Service, Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission, Conservation Fisheries Inc. and SUNY Cobleskill. The stocking sites are located near Olean and Portville, New York and near South Carrolton on the Seneca Nation of Indian’s Reservation.

 

The species is found 20 miles south in Pennsylvania but has been absent from New York for the past 75 years. In addition to their history in the Allegheny watershed, Gilt Darters occur in parts of the Appalachians and in the Midwest. Fish surveys have shown them to exist in only 12 states.

 

Averaging two to three inches in length and occasionally reaching 4 inches, the Gilt Darter is a small-sized fish.  In early summer, Gilt Darter males undergo a brilliantly colorful phase and develop striking yellow black and green shades across their back, explaining why their latin name means “attractive.”  Gilt darters are bottom feeders and eat a variety of invertebrates including aquatic insect larvae and crustaceans.

 

In addition to stocking, restoration of this species in New York includes understanding and protecting their critical habitats. While the exact cause for the fish’s decline is unknown, biologists attribute its decline in New York State to water quality deterioration and past siltation.  Subsequent improvements in water quality and land use conservation practices bode well for the future survival of these fish.  DEC will continue to monitor the status of Gilt Darters in the Allegheny River Watershed and is hopeful that this new population within the Allegheny watershed will become successfully established.

 

More information about Gilt Darters can be found on DEC’s website http://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/26039.html.

 

 


Ohio

Cabela’s to hire 195 to staff new Columbus, OH Store
Applications being accepted now; interviews to begin Nov. 27

Cabela’s announced  plans to hire approximately 195 full-time, part-time and seasonal employees to staff the new Columbus, Ohio, store scheduled to open in spring 2013.  Applications are being accepted now and interviews will begin Nov. 27, running through Dec. 1.

 

To apply, visit www.cabelas.jobs, click on “Apply Now,” then “United States Jobs.” Then follow instructions to log in. Applications must be submitted online. Most employees are expected to come from Columbus and the surrounding area. Typically, Cabela’s attracts applicants with detailed knowledge about the outdoors and an aptitude for customer service.

 

“We are looking for enthusiastic employees who are eager to serve the 

 

many loyal Cabela’s customers across Ohio and the region,” said Jim Daugherty, general manager of the new store. “The ideal candidate is passionate and knowledgeable about the outdoors and enjoys working in the team dynamic.”

 

The 80,000-square-foot store – Cabela’s first Ohio location – will be located at 1650 Gemini Place in the Polaris Shopping Center, which also includes Costco, Cambria Suites, Toys R Us, Babies R Us, Hobby Lobby as well as the Polaris Business Park.

 

Currently, Cabela’s operates 40 retail stores across the United States and Canada. The company has announced plans to open an additional 12 by the end of 2014. 

 


DNR, USFWS stock surplus Lake Trout in Lake Erie

COLUMBUS, OH - The Ohio DNR has joined forces with the USFWS to implement a pilot project to continue the restoration of native lake trout populations in Lake Erie.

 

Lake trout are listed as a species of concern in Ohio because the population was greatly reduced by sea lamprey predation, particularly in Lake Erie’s eastern basin. There has been very little lake trout natural reproduction documented in Lake Erie over the last three decades, despite extensive annual stocking by neighboring state agencies in the eastern basin.

 

During the week of Nov. 5, approximately 120,000 surplus lake trout fingerlings were stocked in Ohio waters of Lake Erie, including the central basin (Fairport Harbor) and western basin (Catawba). These surplus lake trout were raised at the newly-renovated Service Allegheny Fish Hatchery in Warren, Pa. Approximately 200,000 lake trout are raised annually at the Service’s hatchery facility for lake trout restoration efforts in Lake Erie’s eastern region.

 

Lake trout stocked in November have adipose fin clips and a small, coded

wire tag implanted in their snouts. Specific lot numbers on the tags allow biologists to recover stocking, growth, survival and migration return information when the fish is recaptured.

 

To determine stocking success, ODNR Division of Wildlife fish biologists will collect lake trout catch information and fish heads from anglers, commercial fishers and future assessment surveys. Future reef assessment surveys will determine if adult lake trout are homing in to stocking locations to spawn. Restoring lake trout as a key predator in the coldwater regions of Lake Erie will help maintain a healthy, balanced ecosystem.

 

The Service’s mission is to work with others to conserve, protect and enhance fish, wildlife and plants and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American people.

 

ODNR ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR website at www.ohiodnr.com.

 


Wisconsin

Crossbows now allowed during gun deer season

New rule does not apply to archery deer hunting seasons

Any hunter now can use a crossbow during any Wisconsin gun deer season, including muzzleloader, under the authority of their gun deer license and gun deer carcass tags, under new rules approved this year that apply to gun seasons only.

 

An archery license still allows hunting only with a bow and arrow, except that a person age 65 or older and certain qualified disabled hunters may use a crossbow to fill their archery deer carcass tags. Under a 2011 rule change, archers can hunt with bow and arrow during the nine-day gun deer season as long as they comply with the same blaze orange clothing requirements that apply to gun hunters.

 

The crossbow cannot be used in group hunting, which is limited to the gun deer season and to hunters with a gun license using firearms. In group hunting, one hunter can shoot a deer and another can tag it as long as both have gun deer licenses and the gun deer tag is valid for that unit. The two hunters must be within voice contact without the use of electronic devices such as cell phones or walkie talkies.

Just prior to deer season last year, the regulations changed regarding the transportation of firearms and bows.

Highlights are as follows:

  • Firearms no longer need to be cased while in a vehicle, regardless of whether the vehicle is stationary or moving.

  • All long guns must be unloaded when in any vehicle, and in or on a moving vehicle.

  • Handguns can be uncased and loaded in a vehicle, but cannot be concealed unless the person is authorized to possess a concealed weapon.

  • It is illegal to shoot a firearm or bow and arrow from a vehicle, unless disabled and complying with conditions of a disabled hunting permit.

 

DNR conservation wardens are encouraging hunters to review the 2012 hunting regulations pamphlet available at any DNR office or license vendor and also available online at dnr.wi.gov. Just type “deer” into the search box and scroll down for the regulations link. Reviewing the regulations will help ensure a fun, safe and successful hunt.


Other Breaking News Items

(Click on title or URL to read full article)

 

EDITORIAL: Lake Erie’s guardians
Disputes are brew­ing over Ohio’s new per­mit sys­tem to gov­ern wa­ter with­draw­als from Lake Erie un­der the Great Lakes re­gional com­pact

 

RC to ask DNR to help keep fishing strong
After a good year of fishing in Rogers City, Mich., city council members will ask the Michigan Department of Natural Resources to help keep it that way by continuing to stock sport fish in Lake Huron.

 

Fishing seen as way to limit Asian carp invasion
Illinois environmentalists, researchers and policymakers are discussing innovative solutions to stop the invasive Asian carp, including fishing. The state is supporting private efforts to harvest the fish and sell them in China

 

Deadline approaches for grants to remove or maintain aging dams
The Michigan Department of Natural Resources will spend $2.35 million for its dam management program in 2013, the first time the department has been granted money by the Legislature to address problems of aging dams.

Michigan turns lights out on proposed renewable energy mandate
Michigan voters pulled the plug on a proposed constitutional amendment that would have required Michigan's utilities to provide 25 percent of their electricity from renewable sources by 2025.

 

State stocks Lake Erie with surplus steelhead, lake trout
The Ohio Division of Wildlife will stock Lake Erie with surplus lake and steelhead trout. It's been a long time since Ohio planted this species into Lake Erie, agency officials said.

 

State stocks Lake Erie with surplus steelhead, lake trout
The Ohio Division of Wildlife will stock Lake Erie with surplus lake and steelhead trout. It's been a long time since Ohio planted this species into Lake Erie, agency officials said.

 

 

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