Week of July 16, 2012

Words to Ponder
National

Regional

General
Lake Erie

Illinois
Indiana
New York
Canada
Ontario
Other Breaking News Items

 

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Words to Ponder

Words to Ponder…

A lesson in irony
The Food Stamp Program, administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, is proud to be distributing the greatest amount of free meals and food stamps ever.

Meanwhile, the National Park Service, administered by the U.S.

Department of the Interior, asks us to "Please Do Not Feed the Animals."
Their stated reason for the policy is because the animals will grow dependent on handouts and will not learn to take care of themselves.

 

This ends today's lesson."

 


National

Lake Erie water samples test positive for Asian carp eDNA

Michigan and Ohio DNRs planning follow-up actions with partner agencies

Scientific warnings and delayed samples analyses reflected lost opportunities and lax surveillances

Federal and state wildlife officials working in conjunction with academic researchers on Friday, July 13 announced six water samples taken from Sandusky and north Maumee bays tested positive for the presence of Asian carp environmental DNA in Michigan and Ohio waters.

 

The positive samples were among 417 taken from Lake Erie in August 2011, and more than 2,000 samples taken from the Great Lakes Basin since 2010. The Lake Erie batch was recently analyzed and test results were confirmed by eDNA researchers this week. The six positive samples represent less than 1.5 percent of the Lake Erie samples.

 

As early as April 10, 2010 the Great Lakes Sport Fishing Council called for the States of Michigan and Ohio to check out those western Lake Erie rivers for eDNA evidence. We shared significant concern "these big invasive critters could well be hunkered down in the murky depths of the Maumee and quietly expanding their populations." April 26, 2010 article

 

Also, these are the very same samples we subsequently reported on having been taken from Lake Erie but had yet to be analyzed – back in June 13, 2011.

 

A report given by University of Notre Dame researchers as early as March 2010 at the annual Lake Committee Meetings sponsored by the Great Lakes Fishery Commission noted at least eight tributaries at Lake Erie’s west end may be harboring these critters. Thousands of eDNA samples were subsequently taken from many of those tributaries but not analyzed until months later. Contrary to some Illinois studies where a handful of eDNA samples suggested Asian Carp presence in the Chicago Waterway System, and despite weeks of intensive search and destroy efforts by state and federal fisheries personnel no physical sightings have occurred. Yet, within the last ten years, there have been at least three confirmed sightings in western Lake Erie. 

 

Notre Dame research associate Dr. Christopher L. Jerde gave that report at the general session of the annual Lakes Committee meeting but did not appear to generate any significant interest even though Jerde felt it important enough to include it in his presentation.

 

Four samples from Sandusky Bay, in Ohio waters, tested positive for bighead carp eDNA recently, while two samples from north Maumee Bay, in Michigan waters, were positive for silver carp eDNA.

 

In response to these findings, electro-shocking and netting began Friday in Sandusky Bay with no evidence of Asian carp found. However, additional testing and monitoring are planned by the Ohio and Michigan DNRs in conjunction with partner agencies.

 

The findings indicate the presence of genetic material left behind by the species, such as scales, excrement or mucous, but not the establishment of Asian carp in Lake Erie. Positive eDNA tests are regarded by the scientific community as an indicator of the species’ recent presence; however, positive results can occur whether the organism was alive or dead.  While the eDNA findings suggest the possible presence of the invasive species, officials have no physical evidence the fish have migrated to the Great Lakes...

 

In early 2011, Notre Dame research specialist Dr. Christopher Jerde

 

reported collecting 28 samples from the Wabash River near Huntington, 60 from the Little River, 18 from Graham-McCulloch Ditch, 14 from Junk Ditch, 31 from Eagle Marsh, nine from Aboite Creek, six from Robinson Creek, 21 from the St. Marys River, 34 from the St. Joseph’s River, and 17 from the Maumee River. The region was identified back then as having favorable conditions for the potential spread of Asian carp into the Great Lakes. Those samples were not immediately analyzed either.

 

Finally, the Ohio DNR & USGS scheduled some monitoring of Western Lake Erie and the Maumee River specifically; to see if any of those nasty critters may be quietly doing their thing in those waters. As stated in the second paragraph above by the joint Michigan – Ohio statement "The positive samples were among 417 taken from Lake Erie in August 2011 …and were recently analyzed."

 

This certainly didn’t appear to reflect any sense of urgency on the part of those DNR and administration folks who were quick to file multiple lawsuits in federal courts and some failed legislation in Congress.

 

“The results from these water samples are certainly disconcerting, as this marks the first time Asian carp eDNA has been detected in water samples from Lake Erie, or any of the Michigan waters intensively surveyed for the presence of invasive carp,” said Michigan DNR Fisheries Division Chief Jim Dexter. “We are actively engaged in Asian carp surveillance programs throughout the Great Lakes, including Lake St. Clair and Lake Erie, and the Department stands ready to take the necessary and appropriate actions to investigate and respond to these test results.”

 

In response to the positive test results, officials from the Michigan and Ohio DNRs, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, USFWS, and White House Council on Environmental Quality are developing a plan of action in collaboration with the eDNA research team to obtain follow-up samples and test results as quickly as possible. Test results from future water samples will dictate the nature of further response methods.

 

“This lake is Ohio’s greatest resource and our main objective is to keep it healthy,” said Rich Carter, Ohio DNR’s Executive Fish Management and Research Administrator. “The DNA findings have put Ohio fish and wildlife officers on high alert and marshaled our immediate action. In response to these findings, electro-shocking and netting in the identified areas of Sandusky Bay have already been completed and no Asian carp were found. Testing and monitoring will continue and we will work with Michigan and our other management partners to develop a coordinated approach to defining the status of Asian carp in Lake Erie.”

 

Since 2010, the Michigan DNR, Ohio DNR, USFWS, University of Notre Dame, Central Michigan University and the Nature Conservancy have partnered to collect water samples from Great Lakes basin waters, including the Chicago Area Waterway System, southern Lake Michigan, western Lake Erie and tributary streams of lakes Michigan and Erie. The collaborative early-detection Asian carp surveillance program is funded by the USFWS with a federal Great Lakes Restoration Initiative grant, administered under the Asian Carp Control Strategy Framework.

 

A video demonstrating how to identify bighead and silver carp can be viewed on the USFWS YouTube channel at http://youtu.be/B49OWrCRs38. Identification guides, frequently asked questions, management plans and an online reporting form are available online at www.michigan.gov/asiancarp and www.wildohio.com, or call 800-WILDLIFE.


Study highlights need for Urgent Action to prevent establishment Of Asian Carp

Binational Canadian report, notes overall risk of Asian carps to the Great Lakes to be high

ANN ARBOR, MI—The Great Lakes Fishery Commission today received a much-anticipated report assessing the risk of bighead and silver carps to the Great Lakes.  The risk assessment concluded that these two species of Asian carps pose a substantial risk to the Great Lakes if they become established.  While the arrival of Asian carps into the Great Lakes is looming, the establishment and the resulting ecosystem damage is not a foregone conclusion if governments take additional action.  The report noted that although several pathways for bighead and silver carps exist, the Chicago Area Waterway System poses the greatest risk.  The sixteen-month risk assessment project was led by Fisheries and Oceans Canada and included a team of scientists from both Canada and the United States.  The results were peer-reviewed by a team of experts.  The Great Lakes Fishery Commission facilitated the binational effort.  A copy of the risk assessment is available online at www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/csas-sccs/Publications/ResDocs-DocRech/2011/2011_114-eng.html

 

Bighead and silver carps originating from Asia (commonly referred to as “bigheaded carps”, two of four species of “Asian carps”) were imported into the United States in the 1970s to keep aquaculture facilities clean and to manage waste. They were also imported as a foodfish for aquaculture, with the hope of creating a domestic market.  The bigheaded carps escaped into public waterways (e.g., the Mississippi River) through flooding events in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s.  Because these fish spawn and thrive in high water, several years of consistent flooding created prime conditions for extremely strong year classes, which further allowed for rapid growth in populations.  The Chicago Area Waterway System (CAWS), a series of canals and rivers in and near Chicago, is a manmade connection of the Great Lakes and Mississippi River basins.  The waterway is a vibrant transportation corridor, a route for pleasure boats, and a water management system.  The CAWS is also the most-likely pathway for bigheaded carps, the risk assessment concluded.

 

“The report released today represents a state-of-the-art understanding of the risks posed by bighead and silver carps to the Great Lakes” said Robert Lambe, vice-chair of the Great Lakes Fishery Commission.  “Fisheries and Oceans Canada conducted this assessment using the highest standards of science, and took substantial steps to have the assessment peer-reviewed by experts in the field.  Moreover, by involving both Canadian and American scientists in the assessment, the report

drew upon the wealth of expertise in both countries to help us best

understand the risk Asian carps pose to the Great Lakes.  The commission expects that the assessment will inform decisions around the management and prevention of Asian carps.”

 

Michael Hansen, the commission’s chair added:  “This Asian carp risk assessment is sobering.  It concludes that arrival of Asian carps is looming, and should the fish become established in the Great Lakes, that their effects on the ecosystem would be severe.  No lake is spared, with embayments and Lake Erie particularly vulnerable. The Great Lakes contain ample food for Asian carps and ample spawning habitat, making their spread highly likely, even into comparatively less-hospitable places like Lake Superior.”

 

Hansen added:  “We must support every effort to keep bighead and silver carps and other invasive species out of the Great Lakes.  Invasive species threaten the $7 billion fishery and they hurt the economy by undermining tourism, jobs, and prosperity.  This risk assessment, while stressing the substantial risk Asian carps pose to the Great Lakes, is also reason for all relevant agencies to redouble their efforts to prevent an invasion.  The carps are not yet established in the Great Lakes which means we still have time avoid the severe consequences of Asian carps presented in this risk assessment.”

 

The Great Lakes Fishery Commission (and many others) has repeatedly identified re-establishing the natural separation between the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River.  Also, in March, 2010, citizen advisors to the commission—from both Canada and the United States—passed a joint resolution making the same recommendation (www.glfc.org/staff/resol2010_1.pdf). 

 

Most recently, the Great Lakes Commission and the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Cities Initiative released the results of their major study investigating ways to achieve separation between the two basins.  Information about that study is online at www.glc.org/caws/

 

Also, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is conducting a study (GLMRIS) to investigate ways to prevent the movement of species between the Great Lakes and Mississippi Basins.  More information about the corps’ study can be found at glmris.anl.gov/.  

 

The binational risk assessment released today further emphasizes the need for separation to occur.


Asian Carp Report highlights urgent need to save Great Lakes from invasion
Fisheries and Oceans Canada released a binational risk assessment of Asian carp today detailing the potential threat an invasion imposes on the Great Lakes. The conclusions point to a severe disruption of established ecosystems and re-emphasize an urgency for the federal government to act quickly to mitigate the threat, which thus far it has not.

 

Some of the report’s key findings include (from the Fisheries and Oceans Canada website):

 

►The most likely entry point into the Great Lakes basin is the Chicago Area Waterway System (CAWS) into Lake Michigan. The effectiveness of the electrical barrier in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) was not evaluated. Nevertheless, the complex nature of the CAWS and proximity of bigheaded carp populations led to the conclusion this is the most likely entry point.

 

Asian Carp in the Shedd Aquarium, Chicago

►Once bigheaded carps have gained entry into the basin, they are expected to spread to other lakes within 20 years. The spread will be more rapid for lakes Michigan, Huron and Erie, and potentially Lake Superior; longer for Lake 

Ontario.

►Bigheaded carps would find suitable food and thermal and spawning habitats in the Great Lakes basin that would allow them to survive and become established. The areas that would be attractive and favorable are Lake Erie, including Lake St. Clair, and high productivity embayments of lakes Superior, Michigan, Huron and Ontario.

►There is a greater than 50 percent probability of successful mating each year with very few (< 10) adult females (and a similar number of adult males) within the basin of a Great Lake.

►Population growth is most sensitive to the survivorship of juveniles.

►The consequences of an established bigheaded carp population are expected to include changes in planktonic communities, reduction in planktivore biomass, reduced recruitment of fishes with early pelagic life stages and reduced stocks of piscivores.

►To reduce the probability of introduction (either at the arrival, survival, establishment or spread stage) and delay or reduce subsequent ecological consequences, immediate prevention activities would be most effective, especially in conjunction with population management activities at the invasion front.

 

 

 

 

 


UN threatening 2nd Amendment

For the past decade international anti gun groups have attempted to impose registration requirements, ban gun sales, track ammunition purchases, and create a United Nations gun control bureaucracy. 

 

This past Monday, July 2, the United Nations General Assembly quietly convened their conference on the Arms Trade Treaty. This conference, as well as the United Nations itself, poses two of the most serious threats to American gun owners and their constitutional Second Amendment rights.

The National Rifle Association (NRA) has worked hard and tirelessly to support these rights, and up to this point the NRA has been the sole defender of them.

 

Preparations for the Conference of 2012 have been under way since 2006, and the purpose of this conference is to put the finishing touches on the language of the International Arms Trade Treaty.  It could be ready for international ratification by as early as late summer.

 


ICAST New Product Showcase Award Winners
For product details, images and other information please contact the individual award winners' contacts listed below.

ICAST 2012 Overall Best of Show – Hobie Cat, Hobie Mirage Pro Angler 12
Media Contact: Ingrid Niehaus, 949-235-7860, iniehaus@hobiecat.com

 

Best of Show – Apparel – Columbia Sportswear, Airgill Chill Zero Long Sleeve Shirt
Media Contact: Andrea Pallavicini, 503-545-9823, apallavicini@columbia.com

 

Best of Show – Boat - Hobie Cat, Hobie Mirage Pro Angler 12
Media Contact: Ingrid Niehaus, 949-235-7860, iniehaus@hobiecat.com

 

Best of Show - Boating Accessory – JL Marine Systems, Inc. – Power-Pole Drift Paddle
Media Contact: Robert Shamblin, 813-833-0597, robert@powerpole.com

 

Best of Show – Combo – Pure Fishing, Inc., Penn Battle Combo
Media Contact: Ron Giudice, 405-740-2740, ron@blueheroncomm.com

 

Best of Show – Electronics – Johnson Outdoors, Humminbird 360 Imaging
Media Contact: Steve Roth, 402-437-6418, steveroth@swansonrussell.com

 

Best of Show - Eyewear – Costa, Costa 580 P Sunsrise Lenses
Media Contact: Liza Jones, 864-270-0722, liza@fullcirclepr.com

 

Best of Show - Fishing Accessory – American Premier Corporation, The Ultimate Line Winding System
Media Contact: Mike Roe, 909-590-8680, mroe@americanpremiercorp.com

 

Best of Show – FishSmart Tackle – The SeaQuilizer
Media Contact: Allison Liederman, 786-258-1163, info@theseaqualizer.com

 

Best of Show - Fly Fishing Accessory – Luna Sea, LLC - Master Guide Fly Rod "Cush It"
Media Contact: Mick Saundons, 269-806-3596, lunaseamick@hotmail.com

 

Best of Show - Fly Fishing Reel – Eagle Claw Fishing Tackle – Wright & McGill Sabalos Saltwater Fly Reel
Media Contact: Chris Russell, 303-903-4703, crussell@eagleclaw.com

Best of Show - Fly Fishing Rod – G. Loomis – NRX Fly Rod
Media Contact: John Mazurkiewicz, 574-292-2500, jpmazurk@ameritech.net

 

Best of Show - Freshwater Reel – Pure Fishing, Inc., Abu Garcia Revo
Media Contact: Ron Giudice, 405-740-2740, ron@blueheroncomm.com

 

Best of Show - Freshwater Rod – St. Croix Rods – Legend Xtreme
Media Contact: Noel Vick, 612-708-7339, noel@traditionsmedia.com

 

Best of Show – Giftware – 3D Picture Store, Inc. - Jigsaw
Media Contact: Jason Garstecki, 847-921-0760, jay@3dpicturestore.com

 

Best of Show - Kids' Tackle – Pure Fishing, Inc. – Shakespeare Hide-A-Hook Bobber Kit
Media Contact: Ron Giudice, 405-740-2740, ron@blueheroncomm.com

Best of Show – Line – Pure Fishing, Inc. – Berkley Trilene XL/XT
Media Contact: Ron Giudice, 405-740-2740, ron@blueheroncomm.com

 

Best of Show - Hard Lure – Koppers Fishing & Tackle Corporation – Live Target Frog Popper
Media Contact: Tom Choplin, 905-327-9095, tom@koppersfishing.com

 

Best of Show - Soft Lure – Lunkerhunt LP – Bento Baits
Media Contact: David Macdonald, 289-388-7370, david@lunkerhunt.com

 

Best of Show - Saltwater Reel – Pure Fishing, Inc. – Penn Spinfisher V
Media Contact: Ron Giudice, 405-740-2740, ron@blueheroncomm.com

 

Best of Show - Saltwater Rod – St. Croix Rods – Legend Inshore
Media Contact: Noel Vick, 612-708-7339, noel@traditionsmedia.com

 

Best of Show - Tackle Management – Magnetic Marine Products, Inc. – Gear Grabbar Lure Hangar Kit
Media Contact: Jennifer Gesik, 616-292-8793, Jennifer@Magneticmarineproducts.com

 

Best of Show Terminal Tackle – Pure Fishing, Inc. – Berkley Gulp! Jig Heads
Media Contact: Ron Giudice, 405-740-2740, ron@blueheroncomm.com

 

ICAST 2013 will be held at the Las Vegas Convention Center July 10-12, 2013.

For more info: ICASTfishing.org.

 

 


Regional

Lake Erie water samples test positive for Asian carp eDNA

Michigan and Ohio DNRs planning follow-up actions with partner agencies

Scientific warnings and delayed samples analyses reflected lost opportunities and lax surveillances

Federal and state wildlife officials working in conjunction with academic researchers on Friday, July 13 announced six water samples taken from Sandusky and north Maumee bays tested positive for the presence of Asian carp environmental DNA in Michigan and Ohio waters.

 

The positive samples were among 417 taken from Lake Erie in August 2011, and more than 2,000 samples taken from the Great Lakes Basin since 2010. The Lake Erie batch was recently analyzed and test results were confirmed by eDNA researchers this week. The six positive samples represent less than 1.5 percent of the Lake Erie samples.

 

As early as April 10, 2010 the Great Lakes Sport Fishing Council called for the States of Michigan and Ohio to check out those western Lake Erie rivers for eDNA evidence. We shared significant concern "these big invasive critters could well be hunkered down in the murky depths of the Maumee and quietly expanding their populations." April 26, 2010 article

 

Also, these are the very same samples we subsequently reported on having been taken from Lake Erie but had yet to be analyzed – back in June 13, 2011.

 

A report given by University of Notre Dame researchers as early as March 2010 at the annual Lake Committee Meetings sponsored by the Great Lakes Fishery Commission noted at least eight tributaries at Lake Erie’s west end may be harboring these critters. Thousands of eDNA samples were subsequently taken from many of those tributaries but not analyzed until months later. Contrary to some Illinois studies where a handful of eDNA samples suggested Asian Carp presence in the Chicago Waterway System, and despite weeks of intensive search and destroy efforts by state and federal fisheries personnel no physical sightings have occurred. Yet, within the last ten years, there have been at least three confirmed sightings in western Lake Erie. 

 

Notre Dame research associate Dr. Christopher L. Jerde gave that report at the general session of the annual Lakes Committee meeting but did not appear to generate any significant interest even though Jerde felt it important enough to include it in his presentation.

 

Four samples from Sandusky Bay, in Ohio waters, tested positive for bighead carp eDNA recently, while two samples from north Maumee Bay, in Michigan waters, were positive for silver carp eDNA.

 

In response to these findings, electro-shocking and netting began Friday in Sandusky Bay with no evidence of Asian carp found. However, additional testing and monitoring are planned by the Ohio and Michigan DNRs in conjunction with partner agencies.

 

The findings indicate the presence of genetic material left behind by the species, such as scales, excrement or mucous, but not the establishment of Asian carp in Lake Erie. Positive eDNA tests are regarded by the scientific community as an indicator of the species’ recent presence; however, positive results can occur whether the organism was alive or dead.  While the eDNA findings suggest the possible presence of the invasive species, officials have no physical evidence the fish have migrated to the Great Lakes...

 

In early 2011, Notre Dame research specialist Dr. Christopher Jerde

reported collecting 28 samples from the Wabash River near Huntington, 60 from the Little River, 18 from Graham-McCulloch Ditch, 14 from Junk Ditch, 31 from Eagle Marsh, nine from Aboite Creek, six from Robinson Creek, 21 from the St. Marys River, 34 from the St. Joseph’s River, and 17 from the Maumee River. The region was identified back then as having favorable conditions for the potential spread of Asian carp into the Great Lakes. Those samples were not immediately analyzed either.

 

Finally, the Ohio DNR & USGS scheduled some monitoring of Western Lake Erie and the Maumee River specifically; to see if any of those nasty critters may be quietly doing their thing in those waters. As stated in the second paragraph above by the joint Michigan – Ohio statement "The positive samples were among 417 taken from Lake Erie in August 2011 …and were recently analyzed."

 

This certainly didn’t appear to reflect any sense of urgency on the part of those DNR and administration folks who were quick to file multiple lawsuits in federal courts and some failed legislation in Congress.

 

“The results from these water samples are certainly disconcerting, as this marks the first time Asian carp eDNA has been detected in water samples from Lake Erie, or any of the Michigan waters intensively surveyed for the presence of invasive carp,” said Michigan DNR Fisheries Division Chief Jim Dexter. “We are actively engaged in Asian carp surveillance programs throughout the Great Lakes, including Lake St. Clair and Lake Erie, and the Department stands ready to take the necessary and appropriate actions to investigate and respond to these test results.”

 

In response to the positive test results, officials from the Michigan and Ohio DNRs, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, USFWS, and White House Council on Environmental Quality are developing a plan of action in collaboration with the eDNA research team to obtain follow-up samples and test results as quickly as possible. Test results from future water samples will dictate the nature of further response methods.

 

“This lake is Ohio’s greatest resource and our main objective is to keep it healthy,” said Rich Carter, Ohio DNR’s Executive Fish Management and Research Administrator. “The DNA findings have put Ohio fish and wildlife officers on high alert and marshaled our immediate action. In response to these findings, electro-shocking and netting in the identified areas of Sandusky Bay have already been completed and no Asian carp were found. Testing and monitoring will continue and we will work with Michigan and our other management partners to develop a coordinated approach to defining the status of Asian carp in Lake Erie.”

 

Since 2010, the Michigan DNR, Ohio DNR, USFWS, University of Notre Dame, Central Michigan University and the Nature Conservancy have partnered to collect water samples from Great Lakes basin waters, including the Chicago Area Waterway System, southern Lake Michigan, western Lake Erie and tributary streams of lakes Michigan and Erie. The collaborative early-detection Asian carp surveillance program is funded by the USFWS with a federal Great Lakes Restoration Initiative grant, administered under the Asian Carp Control Strategy Framework.

 

A video demonstrating how to identify bighead and silver carp can be viewed on the USFWS YouTube channel at http://youtu.be/B49OWrCRs38. Identification guides, frequently asked questions, management plans and an online reporting form are available online at www.michigan.gov/asiancarp and www.wildohio.com, or call 800-WILDLIFE.

 


Weekly Great Lakes Water Levels for July 13, 2012

WEATHER CONDITIONS

Temperatures across the Great Lakes basin this week were near average to slightly above average for this time of year. The region has experienced little precipitation this week and has received below average precipitation so far this month. Some scattered showers and possible thunderstorms are forecasted for Friday and Saturday. Temperatures should remain fairly stable through Monday for most locations, but a few may see a warm up on Sunday.

LAKE LEVEL CONDITIONS

Lake Superior's water level is 2 inches higher than last year's level, while Lake Michigan-Huron is 8 inches lower than its level of a year ago. Lakes St. Clair, Erie, and Ontario are 11, 13, and 14 inches, respectively, lower than their levels of a year ago. Over the next month, Lake Superior is forecasted to rise 1 inch, while Lake Michigan-Huron is expected to remain near its current level. The water levels of Lakes St. Clair, Erie and Ontario are forecasted to fall 3, 3, and 2 inches, respectively, over the next thirty days.

FORECASTED MONTHLY OUTFLOWS/CHANNEL CONDITIONS

Lake Superior's outflow through the St. Marys River is projected to be below average for the month of July. Lake Huron's outflow into the St. Clair

River and the outflow from Lake St. Clair into the Detroit River are also

expected to be below average throughout the month of July. Lake Erie's outflow through the Niagara River and the outflow of Lake Ontario into the St. Lawrence River are predicted to be below average in July.

ALERTS

Users of the Great Lakes, connecting channels and St. Lawrence River should keep informed of current conditions before undertaking any activities that could be affected by changing water levels. Mariners should utilize navigation charts and refer to current water level readings.

 

 

Superior

Mich-Huron

St. Clair

Erie

Ontario

Level for July 13

601.38

577.59

574.02

571.39

245.44

Datum, in ft

601.10

577.50

572.30

569.20

243.30

Diff in inches

+3

+1

+21

+26

+26

Diff last month

+6

0

-1

-3

-4

Diff from last yr

+2

-8

-11

-13

-14


General

Sportfishing Industry Launches FishSmart Tackle Program
Program promotes the development of tackle and gear that helps the survival of released fish

ORLANDO, FL - July 12, 2012 - The American Sportfishing Association last week announced the next phase of the sportfishing industry's commitment to conservation with the launch of the FishSmart Tackle program. The program was announced during the industry's annual trade show held July 11 – 13, at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Fla.

 

"In fresh water we've done a great job in reducing fish mortality with fish that anglers catch," said ASA's President and CEO Mike Nussman. "More than 80 percent of anglers who caught fish that they could have kept, reported releasing some of them. In saltwater alone, the number of released fish exceeds 200 million annually, and with increasing regulations such as size limits, bag limits and seasons this number is sure to grow."

"However," as Nussman noted, "One of the keys to successful catch and release efforts is having the right kind of tackle that improves the chance that released fish will live. The overall FishSmart program is designed to address this and other fisheries conservation issues, such as angler education, head on."

A collaborative effort between the recreational fishing industry, anglers, federal and state fisheries managers and scientists, FishSmart is focused on developing fishing techniques, management approaches and tackle that reduce the catch of fish that need to be returned to the water and improving the survival of fish that are released.

 

Enhancing new product development through the FishSmart Tackle Program
During ICAST, ASA also launched a new category for FishSmart tackle in the New Product Showcase "Best of Show" competition. Exhibitors enter their most innovative tackle, apparel and accessories in the Showcase to vie for the top spot in 21 product categories. In this, its inaugural year, The SeaQuilizer, developed by the Florida-based company Finovation Inc. took the top spot in the FishSmart Tackle category. The SeaQuilizer is a noninvasive, pressure activated, fish recompression tool that is capable of releasing fish at targeted depths.

"The SeaQuilizer is just one example of the research and innovation that in taking place in the sportfishing industry to help both conserve our nation's fisheries, while at the same time providing anglers with products they can use to make that happen," noted Nussman.

 

The FishSmart approach consists of:

  • Expanding our knowledge and understanding of released fish survival.

  • Developing and employing new technologies and equipment where necessary to enhance released fish survival.

  • Promoting the adoption of improved catch and release techniques to anglers.

  • Developing innovative practices, equipment and management approaches to prevent the catch of unwanted fish.

 

The FishSmart Tackle component of this program will identify and recognize tackle and gear that help to promote the survival of fish that are

 

released. By making anglers aware of these tools and promoting their proper use, anglers will be better prepared as front line conservations which will make a difference in fish survival. Over the next year, ASA will be formalizing the process to recognize work with partners to integrate that information into overall FishSmart messages.

 

"Will such a program work," queried Nussman. "We believe it will. In Australia, 3 out of 5 anglers surveyed recalled advertisements promoting 'fish friendly tackle,' with more than one third of these saying that it helped change their practices. An added benefit to retailers is that sales of some tackle and equipment designed to improve fish survival increased 20-50 percent.

 

Nussman also noted that "Beyond the economics, FishSmart is the right thing to do. Our sport is being held to higher standards and greater scrutiny in today's world and it is incumbent upon the industry to continue to be the leader in promoting responsible stewardship of fishery resources. Such efforts are beyond the scope of any single organization; it will require the efforts of all of us, working together, to make this happen."

 

FishSmart Tackle is the latest in a series of efforts being rolled out to achieve the mission of reducing mortality of released fish. In 2011 and 2012, NOAA Fisheries, in collaboration with the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, provided support to FishSmart to host a series of national and regional workshops to assess the current state of knowledge on released fish survival.

 

"FishSmart is a great example of hands-on action by anglers for real conservation gains," said Russ Dunn, NOAA Fisheries' Recreational Fisheries national policy advisor. "It's about helping all of us fish smarter by developing practical real-world solutions to improve the survival of released fish. NOAA is proud to continue our long-standing relationship with the American Sportfishing Association by partnering with their FishSmart Tackle program."

 

Through these workshops, best release practices have been developed, information gaps identified and guidance to management agencies and organizations developed. Additionally, the FishSmart angler communications and education program, which is designed to supplement ongoing efforts by state and federal agencies, Sea Grant, and other non-governmental agencies, is under development through the Recreational Boating & Fishing Foundation.

 

"FishSmart fits nicely with the conservation component of our mission," said the Recreational Boating & Fishing Foundation's (RBFF) President and CEO Frank Peterson. "By incorporating FishSmart's messages in our communications vehicles we can inform and educate anglers about appropriate gear, best practices and techniques to use when releasing fish." Peterson further said, "By doing this, RBFF will complement conservation outreach efforts already being conducted by state and federal agencies, SeaGrant and other organizations, helping to conserve our fisheries resources and enhance fishing opportunities for the future."

For more information, visit www.fishsmart.org.

 

 


 

World Series of Bass opens doors for all tournament anglers

SAN DIEGO (July 10, 2012) - The chance to go head-to-head against the world's best in any sport isn't usually an option that non-professionals get to consider, but it is now a realistic possibility for bass fishermen.

 

The newly formed World Series of Bass (WSOBASS) creates that exact opportunity for individuals who have the skills and resources to compete at the highest level of the most lucrative national pro bass circuits, but not the time. To qualify for the WSOBASS Main Event and its $600,000 top cash prize, contestants need only to fish one qualifier and finish among the top 35 percent to partake in the $3 million estimated prize pool.

 

Pros, amateurs, collegiate anglers and many other anglers from around the globe compete head-on in what is considered a level playing field because every angler is in total control of his or her own boat and fishing decisions throughout the tournament. Two of the entrants will have earned their spots in the high stakes event through skill competitions in a new reality fishing show called "World Series of Bass, The Dream."

 

"I feel 'The Dream' is the perfect name for the show because most of us bass fishermen dream of fishing for a living and competing against the best anglers in the world," said California entrepreneur and WSOBASS founder Joe Habib. "But reality is, few of us can take the time away from our work and families to give it a go. World Series of Bass presents the opportunity to compete against the best and get a big paycheck for doing so."

 

Three regional qualifying events are scheduled for 2013, each with more than 100 openings for anglers and requiring a $10,000 entry fee. The top 35 anglers from each full-field tournament will make the money cut, earning a $15,000 check and an invitation to compete in the no-entry-fee WSOBASS Main Event.

 

The Main Event is a televised championship in which the 105 anglers who advance from the qualifiers come together and compete for a total purse of $3 million and its payouts of $600,000 for first place, $150,000 for second and $100,000 for third. The cash prize amounts are based on 100 percent payback from the three qualifiers having full-field participation of 100 anglers each.

 

All three regional qualifying events and the Main Event will be nationally televised on NBC Sports Network, The Pursuit Channel and Time Warner's Texas Channel.

 

The qualifiers are three-day tournaments, and the Main Event is a four-day tournament, all with traditional rules. The tournament locations and dates are being withheld until The Dream makes its debut airing on Oct. 8 on the NBC Sports network and January 2013 on The Pursuit Channel.

 

The Dream consists of 13 half-hour episodes and airs weekly. The

program provides a behind-the-scenes look at tournament bass fishing and its participants, a peek into the planning for the WSOBASS events, and a series of fishing skill challenges. Some of the country's top pro bass anglers will make appearances on The Dream, including Mike McClelland, James Niggemeyer, Jared Lintner and Brandon Card. Additional participants will be selected through a video application process open to college anglers, local level pros and all anglers alike.

 

The WSOBASS television show and tournaments offer an interesting new wrinkle to competitive bass fishing that has been a popular activity ever since Ray Scott, often considered the father of tournament bass fishing, put the sport in the national spotlight with his first All-American Invitational Bass Tournament on Arkansas' Beaver Lake in 1967.

 

Habib acknowledges the fact that the $10,000 entry fee to fish in a WSOBASS qualifier is a considerable amount but points out the investment is still substantially less than the fees required to fish an entire trail of top-tier tournaments, plus has greatly reduced travel costs in comparison.

 

"Tournament entry fees are just a part of total expenses, which add up quickly when also considering truck and boat fuel, lodging and meals," Habib explained. "We're talking just one qualifier event to make it to the Main Event, saving time and money for participants, and serving up a chance for a payout that will make it possible for the winner to pursue his or her bass fishing interests at whatever level they please.

 

"My intentions for WSOBASS are to give the many great bass fishermen in this country a chance to pursue their own dreams through a shortened and more cost-effective tournament process, and allowing one out of every three to compete in the Main Event with cash in their pocket and a free entry," he said.

 

Although WSOBASS is not disclosing tournament locations and dates yet, Habib said the three qualifiers will fall in the April - June timeframe, and the Main Event is scheduled for October. The locations have been strategically placed across the country, giving participating anglers the option to choose a qualifying event that is geographically close and/or a body of water that they are comfortable fishing.

 

"While the three qualifiers will take place in the United States, anglers from around the world are welcome to participate," Habib said. "I have spoken with anglers from Japan, Canada, Australia, South Africa and of course, the U.S., who have expressed serious interest in joining the tournaments."

 

Video audition applications for The Dream reality show are being accepted now. Registration for entry into the WSOBASS qualifiers will open in October. Full details about how to apply and more information: www.WorldSeriesOfBass.com.

 


Bass Pro Shops to Open Mega Store in Bridgeport

BRIDGEPORT, CT--Bass Pro Shops has approved plans to be the anchor tenant for the new 50-acre Steelpointe Harbor development located off Interstate 95. The 150,000 square-foot mega destination outdoor store will be the company's first in the Connecticut, New Jersey and metro New York area. It is tentatively scheduled to open Christmas 2013.

More than just a fishing and hunting store, Bass Pro Shops will also offer equipment and clothing for hiking, backpacking, wildlife viewing, camping,

outdoor cooking and more. A gift and nature center will also serve up a
wide variety of outdoor-related items from lamps and dishes to bird feeders and furniture. The expansive boat showroom will feature Tracker, Nitro, SunTracker, Tahoe, Grizzly and Mako boats built by Tracker Marine Group, the world's largest manufacturer of fishing boats.

 

The convenient location off Interstate 95 will allow the store to provide tourists, travelers and outdoor sports enthusiasts of all types with a wide-ranging product line. It is expected to generate at least 250-300 jobs.


Lake Erie

Lake Erie water samples test positive for Asian carp eDNA

Michigan and Ohio DNRs planning follow-up actions with partner agencies

Scientific warnings and delayed samples analyses reflected lost opportunities and lax surveillances

Federal and state wildlife officials working in conjunction with academic researchers on Friday, July 13 announced six water samples taken from Sandusky and north Maumee bays tested positive for the presence of Asian carp environmental DNA in Michigan and Ohio waters.

 

The positive samples were among 417 taken from Lake Erie in August 2011, and more than 2,000 samples taken from the Great Lakes Basin since 2010. The Lake Erie batch was recently analyzed and test results were confirmed by eDNA researchers this week. The six positive samples represent less than 1.5 percent of the Lake Erie samples.

 

As early as April 10, 2010 the Great Lakes Sport Fishing Council called for the States of Michigan and Ohio to check out those western Lake Erie rivers for eDNA evidence. We shared significant concern "these big invasive critters could well be hunkered down in the murky depths of the Maumee and quietly expanding their populations." April 26, 2010 article

 

Also, these are the very same samples we subsequently reported on having been taken from Lake Erie but had yet to be analyzed – back in June 13, 2011.

 

A report given by University of Notre Dame researchers as early as March 2010 at the annual Lake Committee Meetings sponsored by the Great Lakes Fishery Commission noted at least eight tributaries at Lake Erie’s west end may be harboring these critters. Thousands of eDNA samples were subsequently taken from many of those tributaries but not analyzed until months later. Contrary to some Illinois studies where a handful of eDNA samples suggested Asian Carp presence in the Chicago Waterway System, and despite weeks of intensive search and destroy efforts by state and federal fisheries personnel no physical sightings have occurred. Yet, within the last ten years, there have been at least three confirmed sightings in western Lake Erie. 

 

Notre Dame research associate Dr. Christopher L. Jerde gave that report at the general session of the annual Lakes Committee meeting but did not appear to generate any significant interest even though Jerde felt it important enough to include it in his presentation.

 

Four samples from Sandusky Bay, in Ohio waters, tested positive for bighead carp eDNA recently, while two samples from north Maumee Bay, in Michigan waters, were positive for silver carp eDNA.

 

In response to these findings, electro-shocking and netting began Friday in Sandusky Bay with no evidence of Asian carp found. However, additional testing and monitoring are planned by the Ohio and Michigan DNRs in conjunction with partner agencies.

 

The findings indicate the presence of genetic material left behind by the species, such as scales, excrement or mucous, but not the establishment of Asian carp in Lake Erie. Positive eDNA tests are regarded by the scientific community as an indicator of the species’ recent presence; however, positive results can occur whether the organism was alive or dead.  While the eDNA findings suggest the possible presence of the invasive species, officials have no physical evidence the fish have migrated to the Great Lakes...

 

In early 2011, Notre Dame research specialist Dr. Christopher Jerde

reported collecting 28 samples from the Wabash River near Huntington, 60 from the Little River, 18 from Graham-McCulloch Ditch, 14 from Junk Ditch, 31 from Eagle Marsh, nine from Aboite Creek, six from Robinson Creek, 21 from the St. Marys River, 34 from the St. Joseph’s River, and 17 from the Maumee River. The region was identified back then as having favorable conditions for the potential spread of Asian carp into the Great Lakes. Those samples were not immediately analyzed either.

 

Finally, the Ohio DNR & USGS scheduled some monitoring of Western Lake Erie and the Maumee River specifically; to see if any of those nasty critters may be quietly doing their thing in those waters. As stated in the second paragraph above by the joint Michigan – Ohio statement "The positive samples were among 417 taken from Lake Erie in August 2011 …and were recently analyzed."

 

This certainly didn’t appear to reflect any sense of urgency on the part of those DNR and administration folks who were quick to file multiple lawsuits in federal courts and some failed legislation in Congress.

 

“The results from these water samples are certainly disconcerting, as this marks the first time Asian carp eDNA has been detected in water samples from Lake Erie, or any of the Michigan waters intensively surveyed for the presence of invasive carp,” said Michigan DNR Fisheries Division Chief Jim Dexter. “We are actively engaged in Asian carp surveillance programs throughout the Great Lakes, including Lake St. Clair and Lake Erie, and the Department stands ready to take the necessary and appropriate actions to investigate and respond to these test results.”

 

In response to the positive test results, officials from the Michigan and Ohio DNRs, the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, USFWS, and White House Council on Environmental Quality are developing a plan of action in collaboration with the eDNA research team to obtain follow-up samples and test results as quickly as possible. Test results from future water samples will dictate the nature of further response methods.

 

“This lake is Ohio’s greatest resource and our main objective is to keep it healthy,” said Rich Carter, Ohio DNR’s Executive Fish Management and Research Administrator. “The DNA findings have put Ohio fish and wildlife officers on high alert and marshaled our immediate action. In response to these findings, electro-shocking and netting in the identified areas of Sandusky Bay have already been completed and no Asian carp were found. Testing and monitoring will continue and we will work with Michigan and our other management partners to develop a coordinated approach to defining the status of Asian carp in Lake Erie.”

 

Since 2010, the Michigan DNR, Ohio DNR, USFWS, University of Notre Dame, Central Michigan University and the Nature Conservancy have partnered to collect water samples from Great Lakes basin waters, including the Chicago Area Waterway System, southern Lake Michigan, western Lake Erie and tributary streams of lakes Michigan and Erie. The collaborative early-detection Asian carp surveillance program is funded by the USFWS with a federal Great Lakes Restoration Initiative grant, administered under the Asian Carp Control Strategy Framework.

 

A video demonstrating how to identify bighead and silver carp can be viewed on the USFWS YouTube channel at http://youtu.be/B49OWrCRs38. Identification guides, frequently asked questions, management plans and an online reporting form are available online at www.michigan.gov/asiancarp and www.wildohio.com, or call 800-WILDLIFE.


Illinois

Becoming an Outdoors Woman Workshop Sept 28-30

The IDNR invites women to register now for the next ‘Becoming an Outdoors Woman’ workshop, Sept. 28-30 at Pere Marquette State Park, Grafton.  BOW workshops are designed to provide introductory instruction in many outdoor related activities.  Classes are taught in a non-competitive and non-threatening environment by experienced instructors. 

The cost is $160 per person, which includes the workshop, meals, lodging and transportation during the event.  Workshop and registration materials can be found on the IDNR website at www.dnr.state.il.us/lands/Landmgt/Bow.

 


Indiana

Low water requires increased diligence at boat ramps

As a result of the drought, more public boat ramps are becoming unsafe for launching trailered boats, especially on rivers.

Shallow water has increased the risk that boat operators will drive their trailers over the ends of boat ramps, especially in muddy rivers where ramps can be difficult to see underwater.

 

The trailers could become stuck or damaged, according to Jamie Smyth, fisheries staff specialist with the DNR Division of Fish & Wildlife.

“Use common sense,” Smyth said. “Don’t push it too far. If you decide to launch a trailered boat, go nice and slow.”

DNR boat ramps are administered through the DNR divisions of Fish & Wildlife and State Parks & Reservoirs.

 

The Division of Fish & Wildlife maintains hundreds of boat ramps across Indiana through its public access program and does not monitor water levels at each one. DFW does not plan on closing any ramps and is instead urging people to use their own discretion.

Some ramps are currently only suitable for launching canoes, kayaks and small, hand-carried boats, Smyth said.

 

“Once you safely launch your boat, use extra caution to avoid shallow water, rocks and other obstacles,” Smyth said.

 

The DNR Division of State Parks & Reservoirs has closed the Portland Mills boat ramp at Raccoon Lake, although the main boat ramp remains open.

 

At Mississinewa Lake, the Pearson Mill boat ramp is open for small boats only and the Frances Slocum boat ramp is open for bass-type boats, but not large speed boats. The Red Bridge and Miami boat ramps at Mississinewa remain open with no restrictions.

 

Water levels are abnormally low at all DNR reservoirs, and boaters are urged to use caution.

 


Volunteer for Hoosier Outdoor Experience, Sept. 15-16

Volunteers are needed to help with Indiana’s largest hands-on outdoor recreation event, the Hoosier Outdoor Experience, Sept. 15-16.

 

Held at Fort Harrison State Park in Indianapolis, this free event of the Indiana DNR features more than 50 hands-on activities, such as fishing, mock archaeological dig, mountain biking and many more activities. Attendees can interact with 120 grassroots partners to learn about how to enjoy the outdoors.

Each day, the event opens to the public at 9 a.m. and runs until 6 p.m. Volunteers and staff are on site at 8 a.m. for setup and an hour after gates close for tear-down.

 

Sign up to volunteer at http://2012experiencevolunteers.eventbrite.com. Questions? Contact volunteer coordinator Cheryl Hampton, (317) 233-1002, champton@dnr.IN.gov or Leah Kopp, (317) 234-1064, lkopp@dnr.IN.gov. More at www.hoosieroutdoorexperience.IN.gov.


New York

NY approves Legislation for more Free Fishing Clinics

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo has signed legislation to expand free fishing clinics in New York, allowing more New Yorkers to experience fishing for the first time by increasing the number of free clinics that can be held throughout the state.

 

The Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) conducts fishing clinics to help introduce individuals and families to recreational angling. Participants are not required to have a fishing license in order to attend these clinics. Under previous law, only four free sport fishing clinics could be held annually in each of DEC's nine regions and DEC employees were required to provide at least part of the instruction at the events.

The law signed by the Governor permits DEC to hold more clinics, and also allows other entities to conduct fishing clinics with DEC authorization. By allowing additional free sport fishing clinics, the law is designed to promote participation in recreational angling across New York State. Many local sporting federations and recreational groups run similar fishing clinics and enabling these groups to administer free clinics with DEC guidelines will benefit all New Yorkers who may be interested in fishing and enjoying the outdoors.

 

New York's sport fishing industry generates an estimated $1.8 billion in economic activity annually, supporting nearly 17,000 jobs.

 


Local Husband/Wife team wins local Derby

DUNKIRK, July 8, 2012-- A local fishing team made up of two couples won the AMARA-CAN  Walleye Classic, one of the bigger tournaments for this area, this past weekend.  The event was hosted by the New York Walleye Association.  The team consisted of  Jim & Kim Skoczylas, of Sheldon, NY and Jim & Diane Steel, of Alexander, NY.      The tournament took place on Lake Erie and ran out of the City of Dunkirk harbor on Saturday, July 7th and Sunday, July 8th.  

 

The team began fishing on Thursday with Jim and Diane's daughters, Katie & Ashley Stanley on Thursday to prepare for the upcoming tournament.  On Thursday, Ashley, 10 years old, brought in a 10 lb walleye.   The team fished again on Friday and caught 13 fish.  The tournament began on Saturday, July 7th.  Each team is allowed to weigh in a maximum of 5 fish per day with a minimum length of 20 inches each.  Their total weight for Saturday was 42.58 lbs.  This was enough weight to be the

leader out of 82 teams at the end of day one.  Most of their fish were

caught using lead core line and Torpedo Divers on worm harnesses, some of which they make themselves. 

 

Their two day total for 10 fish was 80.30 lbs., just enough to take 1st place and $2,350 in prize money.  The team was presented with the trophy and prize money by the City of Dunkirk mayor. This was the team's (and team members) very first tournament win. 

 

In the past 5 years, Jim & Jim have rapidly advanced their fishing to a new level.  They were fishing mostly for fun in small open boats.  A few years ago their wives began fishing with them.  Even though Jim & Jim had fished this tournament for years, just last year the two couples fished this tournament together for the first time.  In a predominately male sport, it is exciting to see more women getting involved.  The second place team after day one was also made up of two couples, Chuck, Ruth, Chuck and Casey Mohr.  They hope to inspire more women, more couples and more families to spend their time together out fishing too.


Ontario

Enforcement blitz finds mostly honest anglers

Almost 95 % of anglers checked during an enforcement blitz in the Sioux Lookout area were found to be obeying the law.

Ministry of Natural Resources conservation officers from the Sioux Lookout, Kenora and Fort Frances districts conducted the enforcement blitz on June 20 and 21, 2012. Officers checked 863 anglers, including 805 non-residents, for compliance with the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Act and the Ontario Fishery Regulations.

They laid 16 charges and issued 25 warnings while conducting checks at over 25 area fishing lodges and a provincial park. They also seized a total of 37 walleye which were forfeited to the Crown.

Charges and warnings were issued for-
► possessing an over-limit of fish
► transporting fish taken unlawfully as they were in a restricted size range
► transporting live fish or spawn

► failing to keep fish measurable and identifiable

► unlawfully packaged fish which could not readily be counted, identified or measured, and
► fishing without a licence and failing to produce a licence.

 

In addition, officers issued warnings for infractions under the Liquor Licence Act for consuming liquor outside licensed premises, a residence or a private place. A charge was also laid under the Public Lands Act for disobeying road closure signs.

For more info on fishing regulations www.mnr.gov.on.ca/en/Business/LetsFish/Publication/STEL02_

163615.html, available at ServiceOntario/Government Information Centres www.mnr.gov.on.ca/en/ContactUs/2ColumnSubPage/STEL02_

178999.html and from licence issuers and at ontario.ca/fishing.

To report a natural resources violation, call 1-877-TIPS-MNR (847-7667) toll-free any time. You can also call Crime Stoppers anonymously at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477).


Canada

Nearly Half Million Canadian Salmon with Infectious Virus to be exterminated

An infectious salmon anemia virus has been detected for the first time in an aquaculture site in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. The virus has been detected before in the wild, according to Miranda Pryor, executive director of the province’s Aquaculture Industry Association.

 

The infectious salmon anemia is currently being contained to one site near Conne River, but in an interview with The Globe and Mail, Pryor said 450,000 salmon at the Gray Aqua Group will have to be destroyed.   The infectious salmon anemia virus (ISA) causes severe anemia of the infected fish, leading the fish to develop pale gills and gulp for air close to the water’s surface. Some fish do not display any symptoms at all and seem to die suddenly. Necropsies of these fish show swollen, congested or partially dead livers and spleens.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) confirmed the presence of the virus on Friday, although Pryor said an infection was suspected two weeks ago.  The CFIA said there is no worry about an effect on human health or food safety and that the disease poses no risk to other wild species like lobster, cod or herring.

 

This will be a heavy blow to the aquaculture industry, as was an outbreak of ISA in New Brunswick in the late 1990s. At the time, the Canadian federal government had to provide tens of millions of dollars in compensation to the industry.  Gray Aqua Group Vice President Clyde Collier said the aquaculture site has taken the finding very seriously and will co-operate fully with the CFIA to destroy and dispose of affected salmon and disinfect the entire facility.

 


Other Breaking News Items

(Click on title or URL to read full article)

 

Army Corps of Engineers studying mandate for new Asian carp plan in Great Lakes
The Army Corps of Engineers said it is evaluating a congressional mandate -- signed into law by the president last week -- to devise a plan for blocking Asian carp from entering the Great Lakes at Chicago and more than a dozen other potential entry points

 

New alarm sounded about Asian carp threat to Great Lakes
A report by Fisheries and Oceans Canada shows that Asian carp would likely thrive in all five Great Lakes, and the introduction of fewer than 20 of the invasive fish could be enough to set off a spawning spree that could forever change the region's ecosystem.

 

Lake Michigan water levels continue to drop
Nature - precipitation, temperature, lack of winter ice cover - is a driving force behind lake levels, but humans have a played a significant role as well.

 

On heartland's great rivers, scientists struggle to measure impact of Asian carp invasion
Research on the impact of booming Asian carp populations in the rivers of North America has been difficult due to fluctuating conditions; however, scientists remain determined to solve the mystery before the invaders reach the Great Lakes to prevent the feared damage.

 

COMMENTARY:Obama team’s Asian carp response: by the book
This week's presentation by the Obama administration’s Asian carp team on how it’s stopping the advance of the voracious fish that threaten the Great Lakes was regimented, informative, and boring.

 

The search resumes Tuesday for possible Asian Carp in Illinois lake close to Lake Michigan
For a second time this year, an intensive four day search for the invasive Asian Carp gets underway in Lake Calumet on Tuesday after the discovery of Asian Carp DNA in the waterway.

 

Invasive plants, fish threaten Great Lakes region
The first aquatic invasive species in the Great Lakes was the sea lamprey in the 1830s. Now more than 180 species are in the region, and 10 more are "knocking on the door," says a senior policy director for The Nature Conservancy.

EDITORIAL: Keep fighting to stop Asian carp
Wisconsin should keep fighting in court and in Congress to stop the Asian carp from reaching the Great Lakes.

 

Atlantic salmon catching on in Great Lakes
10 years after the collapse of its chinook salmon fishery, northern Lake Huron seems to be rallying with a mixture of Atlantic salmon, lake trout, steelhead, pink salmon and even a few chinooks.

 

 

 

The opinions expressed here are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the GLSFC, its officers or staff. 

Reproduction of any material by paid-up members of the GLSFC is encouraged but appropriate credit must be given. 

Reproduction by others without written permission is prohibited.

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