Week of June 27, 2011

Hunting & Shooting Products/Issues
National

Regional

2nd Amendment Issues

Illinois
Michigan
Wisconsin
Other Breaking News Items

 

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       New Product  Archives

Hunting & Shooting Products/Issues

Bushnell ImageView Spotting Scope

Bushnell Outdoor Products, an industry-leader in high performance sports optics for more than 60 years, introduces the ImageView Spotting Scope, a unique innovation in the optics industry. By uniquely combining a spotting scope and digital camera, the ImageView Spotting Scope gives outdoor and nature enthusiasts the opportunity to record their outdoor adventures and enjoy  memories for years to come.

 

The ImageView Spotting Scope combines a 150in power spotting scope with a 5.0 megapixel digital camera. With a 70mm objective lens and the characteristic bright multi-coated optics from Bushnell, users experience a bright, crisp image. Once the user has the scope focused via the zoom eyepiece, the ImageView can instantly be switched over to camera mode to take flawless photos of the subject. The internal digital camera provides 22x magnification, giving users the ability to capture incredible images that were

previously unattainable without expensive photography equipment.

 

The ImageView captures both still pictures and videos. It boasts a flip-up 2.5" viewing screen to review what has been captured or recorded and includes a table tripod, remote shutter cable and soft carrying case. Another notable feature is the USB port, which allows the spotting scope to be plugged directly into a computer for quick and convenient viewing.

 

The ImageView is compatible with SD cards up to 32 GB capacity, giving users the ability to capture an entire trip's worth of high resolution digital images or video clips before having to pause to download files.

 

About $479.95

 

800-423-3537

 

www.bushnell.com

 


Bushnell Equinox Night Vision Series

New Era of Night Vision Optics

The new Bushnell Equinox series of night vision monoculars bring unrivaled performance, even in zero ambient light. The Equinox series includes one Generation 1 and two digital models, all featuring rugged, water-resistant housings that meet IXP-4 waterproof specifications.  

 

The compact 2x 28mm Generation 1 model features true two times power magnification and bright clear optics. It has a bright infrared (IR) illuminator and excellent battery life - up to six hours of use. At just under nine ounces, this compact and lightweight unit packs more intensity than many other Generation 1 devices.

 

The digital models are available in 4x 40mm and 6x 50mm configurations. They also feature outstanding optical clarity and offer users a unique feature called Dual Image Output, which allows users to switch from a black and white image to green with the press of a button. The black and white

is optimal when some ambient light is available, either at dusk or dawn or under bright moonlight while the green screen is ideal for almost-dark to completely dark conditions. The human eye sees more shades of green than any other color, making the green image 30 percent more effective in dark conditions.

 

Both digital models have two integrated polarized filters to defuse the intense beam of light and make it more natural to the eye. The screen brightness and image contrast are both easily adjustable for optimal viewing.

  

Each device is tripod mountable and includes integrated accessory rails that facilitate the addition of a light to dramatically extend the viewing range. Equinox night vision monoculars are popular for wildlife watching, hunting, landowner security, or any other nighttime activity. 

 

Click here to view specs. 

 

About $299.99 - 499.95

 

800-423-3537

 

www.bushnell.com

 


National

Legislation Introduced to Stop Unwarranted Fisheries Closures
Fisheries Science Improvement Act will help ensure science is primary driver of federal fisheries decisions

The Fisheries Science Improvement Act (H.R. 2034), introduced in the House of Representatives by Rep. Rob Wittman (R-VA) on June 23, 2011, with the support of a bi-partisan group of 18 other Members of Congress, seeks to ensure that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries) is required to set catch limits based on data, not on guesstimates.

This legislation will guide federal fisheries management towards a more science-based approach and prevent NOAA Fisheries from setting arbitrary and overly-restrictive catch levels on numerous important recreational fisheries.  H.R. 2304 provides a timely path for NOAA Fisheries to manage all of America's marine fish stocks based on sound scientific data.

View the Fishery Science Improvement Act Fact Sheet.

The Situation
As amended in 2006, the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act requires Regional Fishery Management Councils to put in place annual catch

limits (ACLs) and accountability measures (AMs) for every

fishery by December 31, 2011. The requirements were intended to end overfishing by 2011 but were predicated on two critical assumptions:

►NOAA Fisheries would make decisions based on up-to-date and accurate stock assessments

►NOAA Fisheries would improve catch data to better anticipate potential problems in a given fishery.

 

Neither of these obligations has been met.

 

Scientific management should be the cornerstone of fisheries management at NOAA. However, the agency has felt compelled by statutory deadlines to make major fishery management decisions using inadequate data and incomplete analysis. NOAA Fisheries is simply making guesses in many cases when setting catch limits and in determining other management parameters, and guesswork should have no place in federal fisheries management.

 

How You Can Help
Send a message to your Member of Congress in support of the Fishery Science Improvement Act.


House to vote to bring back the bulb
Impending federal ban on the standard incandescent light bulb could finally be killed

House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Fred Upton, R-Mich., has said he will support a bill this summer that means lights out on the looming 2012 ban on the common light bulb. Upton himself co-sponsored 2007 legislation making light bulbs illegal, a ban that has become a symbol of bipartisan Big Government run amok.

 

Upton has come under increased pressure in recent weeks after failing to follow up on a promise he made after assuming the committee chairmanship that he would hold hearings on reversing the ban. After months of paralysis – and with the ban just six months from going into effect on January 1 – outrage was building among his own Republican committee colleagues and conservative activists, including a national petition campaign, FreeOurLight.org, sponsored by the influential Competitive Enterprise Institute.

 

Upton is working with Texas Republicans Joe Barton and Mike Burgess on language repealing the light bulb standards. “We’re very close to seeing an agreement emerge and happen,” Upton told reporters at a briefing hosted by the Heritage Foundation.

 

In keeping with Washington’s stealth energy policies on auto mpg and greenhouse emissions, Upton’s original 2007 bill – touted by then House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and President Bush – was not an outright repeal but a backdoor sneak play in the larger 2007 energy law that would have eventually phased out bulbs that use more than 40 watts.

This would have effectively banned Edison’s invention which is the choice of 85 percent of American bulb purchases.

 

Republicans – led by Texas Rep. Joe Barton together with fellow Texan Michael Burgess and Rep. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn. – introduced bulb restoration legislation immediately upon the GOP taking over the House this year. Republicans overwhelmingly support bringing back the bulb.

 

The ban had been supported by big corporations like General Electric and Philips who saw a an opportunity to use government to monopolize a new, more expensive market while transferring jobs to China to earn higher margins.  “Nobody has to buy a CFL, and that’s a common misconception,” said Randy Moorhead, vice president of government affairs for Philips, this spring. “This is a political controversy that’s undeserved.” The Philips slippery answer refers to even more expensive options than CFLs and ignored the fact that the banned incandescent is the cheap and overwhelming favorite of consumers.

 

“We don’t think the consumer needs to pay $4 a light bulb, and we don’t think the federal government should tell people what kind of lighting to use in their homes,” Rep. Barton told Fox News this week.

 

The House vote will finally bring light – pun intended – to an issue exposing how dictatorial Washington has become. Members will vote against the bulb at their peril.

 

 


VanDam again named Angler of the Year

FOND DU LAC, Wis. — Kevin VanDam has won the 2011 B.A.S.S. Angler of the Year title – his seventh such honor. VanDam secured the title Sunday at the conclusion of the regular season finale held on Wheeler Lake in Decatur, Ala.


VanDam of Kalamazoo, Mich., continued his Elite Trail domination by winning a record-setting fourth consecutive Bassmaster Angler of the Year title – surpassing legendary angler Roland Martin’s previous-best three consecutive Angler of the Year titles. VanDam also became the first angler to take both the Angler of the Year and Bassmaster Classic titles in two consecutive years.

VanDam finished with 2,026 points in the Angler of the Year standings – 153 ahead of runner up Edwin Evers, who finished with 1,873. Evers, also sponsored by Mercury, has finished second to VanDam the last two seasons.

 

VanDam now owns seven Angler of the Year titles to go accompany his four Bassmaster Classic championships. He’s qualified for 22 consecutive Bassmaster Classic titles – including 2012 – and has 94 top 10 B.A.S.S. finishes.

Mercury's Ott DeFoe topped Rookie of the Year standings.

 

 


Regional

IJC Public-Meetings on Great Lakes Water levels

Input important on the water level options listed by the study group

WINDSOR, ONT. --- The International Upper Great Lakes Study is holding public meetings this summer to provide information regarding the status of the second and final phase of its work, examining Great Lakes water levels. At the meetings, the public will have an opportunity to hear from Study Board members and researchers about preliminary findings and potential regulation plans.

 

Also, your input is important on the water level options listed by the study group

 

Meetings schedule by state: 

Wisconsin:
Monday, July 18, 7-9 PM. (CDT) Third Avenue Playhouse, 239 N. Third Ave., Sturgeon Bay;
Tuesday, July 19, 7-9 PM. (CDT),  U. of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s Great Lakes WATER Institute, 600 E. Greenfield Ave.;

Tuesday, Aug. 9, 7-9 PM. (CDT) Yellowjacket Union, U of Wisconsin-Superior, 1605 Catlin Ave

 

Michigan/Ohio:

(Lake Michigan, Lake St. Clair, Lake Erie)

Wednesday, July 27, 7-9 PM, Toledo, OH (Lake Erie Center)

Thursday, July 28, 7-9 PM Grosse Pointe Farms, MI (War 

Memorial)Saturday, July 30, 10-Noon, Muskegon, MI (AWRI)

 

Ontario:

(St. Clair River, Georgian Bay)

Tuesday, August 2, 7-9 PM, Sarnia, ON (TBD)

Wednesday, August 3, 7-9 PM, Collingwood, ON (Royal Canadian Legion)

Thursday, August 4, 7-9 PM, Midland, ON (Royal Canadian Legion)

Saturday, August 6, 10-Noon, Manitoulin Island, ON (KagawongPark Center)

 

Minnesota, Ontario:

(Lake Superior)

Tuesday, August 9, 7-9 PM, Duluth MN (site TBD)

Wednesday, August 10, 7-9 PM Thunder Bay, ON (TBD)

Thursday, August 11, 7-9 PM Sault Ste. Marie, ON (TBD)

 

Note: All meetings are 7-9 PM except Muskegon and Manitoulin, which are 10-Noon

 

Meeting Summary

12 meetings

6 in Canada, 6 in U.S

2 on Superior; 1 on St. Marys River

3 on Lake Huron; 1 on St. Clair River

3 on Lake Michigan

1 on Lake Erie

1 on Lake St. Clair


Weekly Great Lakes Water Levels for June 24, 2011 

WEATHER CONDITIONS

Scattered storms have dropped precipitation on most of the Great Lakes region throughout the week.  Storms moving through western areas dropped up to 2 inches of rain Monday.  The Great Lakes basin will continue experiencing scattered showers through Friday but these should clear out Saturday, leaving a couple of days with clearer skies.  Recent frontal systems have caused temperatures in most areas to be cooler than seasonal averages heading into the weekend.  More scattered showers and thunderstorms may move through the basin again Monday and Tuesday, and temperatures are expected to rise above average for a few days early next week.

LAKE LEVEL CONDITIONS

Currently, Lake Superior is 1 inch above last year's level and Lake Michigan-Huron is 1 inch below the level of a year ago.  Lakes St. Clair, Erie, and Ontario are 6, 10, and 16 inches, respectively, higher than they were at this time last year. Over the next thirty days, Lakes Superior and Michigan-Huron are projected to climb 3 inches and 1 inch, respectively.  The water levels of Lakes St. Clair, Erie, and Ontario are forecasted to decrease 4, 5, and 7 inches, respectively, over the next month. 

FORECASTED MONTHLY OUTFLOWS/CHANNEL CONDITIONS

Lake Superior's outflow through the St. Mary's River is projected to be below average for the month of June.  The outflows from Lake Huron into the St. Clair River, and from

Lake St. Clair into the Detroit River, are expected to be

below average throughout the month of June. Lake Erie's outflow through the Niagara River is predicted to be above average and the outflow of Lake Ontario into the St. Lawrence River is predicted to be above average.

ALERTS

The water level of Lake Superior is below chart datum and is forecasted to remain below chart datum until July.  Users of the Great Lakes, connecting channels and St. Lawrence River should keep informed of current conditions before undertaking any activities that could be affected by changing water levels.  Mariners should utilize navigation charts and refer to current water level readings.

 

 

Superior

Mich-Huron

St. Clair

Erie

Ontario

Level for June 24

600.98

578.15

574.87

572.7

247.01

Datum, in ft

601.10

577.50

572.30

569.20

243.30

Diff in inches

-1

+8

+31

+42

+45

Diff last month

+4

+3

+2

+2

-1

Diff from last yr

+1

-1

+6

+10

+16


2nd Amendment Issues

Illinois once again comes in last place on public safety

But comes in first place when it comes to politics

The officers, directors and members of the Illinois State Rifle Association are offering their congratulations to the good people of Wisconsin upon the passage of concealed carry legislation by the Wisconsin House of Representatives.  Passage of similar legislation earlier this month by the Wisconsin Senate along with Gov. Walker’s pledge to sign a concealed carry bill means that the law-abiding citizens of Wisconsin will finally be able to lawfully protect themselves and their families from violent criminals.

 

This good fortune enjoyed by the citizens of Wisconsin underscores the ongoing plight of their neighbors to the south.  Once the Wisconsin governor signs concealed carry into law, Illinois will be the only state in the nation that prohibits its citizens from protecting themselves with the most effective tool available – the defensive firearm.  As recently as May, the Illinois House had the opportunity to pass life-saving concealed carry legislation.  Unfortunately, a small but powerful contingent of Chicago lawmakers sabotaged the legislation, thus causing the bill to fall a half-dozen votes short of passage.

 

“A few members of the Illinois General Assembly have

taken it upon themselves to decide who is worth defending and who is not,” commented ISRA Executive Director, Richard Pearson.  “By voting concealed carry down, they are clearly siding with the bad guys while letting the good people of Illinois take it on the chin from murderers, robbers, rapists and the increasingly-popular flash-mobs.”

 

“This small band of legislative hold-outs believes that they can act with impunity,” continued Pearson.  “But, we have news for them.  The law abiding citizens of Illinois will fight tirelessly to recapture their right to self defense.  This battle will be waged relentlessly at the polls and in the courts.  Currently, there is a pair of federal lawsuits in the courts that address Illinois’ persistent denial of the law-abiding citizen’s right to self defense.  We expect a favorable outcome in the courts but, if these actions fail, it just means that more actions will follow.  Our determination on this matter is single-minded.  We will fight until we win – no matter how long it takes.”

 

“By now, Illinois is used to coming in last place in nearly every form of endeavor,” said Pearson.  “But one thing is for certain, Illinois comes in first place when it comes to placing politics before public safety.”    www.isra.org

 


Illinois

Tickets available for $100,000 Illinois Sportsman’s Raffle

Conservation foundation raffle benefits youth conservation education

SPRINGFIELD, IL – Tickets are now available for the 2011 Illinois Conservation Foundation Sportsman’s Raffle with a $100,000 first-place prize.

 

Tickets for the raffle are $100 each. The grand prize of $100,000 will be presented at a drawing on Thursday, December 1, 2011.  Additional “early bird” prizes will be awarded for tickets drawn on August 4, September 1, October 6 and November 3, 2011.    

 

Proceeds from the 2011 Illinois Conservation Foundation Sportsman’s Raffle will support youth conservation education and outdoor recreation programs at the ICF’s Torstenson Family Youth Conservation Education Center in Pecatonica, Illinois.

 

“This raffle allows you the chance to win one of several fantastic cash prizes, but on a larger scale, you’re pledging your support to the development of the Torstenson Family Youth Conservation Education Center,

a place where youth can gain an appreciation for the

Prairie State’s vast natural resources,” said Mark Spangler, Illinois Conservation Foundation Executive Director.  “Your purchase of an ICF Sportsman’s Raffle ticket will help us achieve our goal of expanding youth conservation education opportunities.”

 

Raffle prizes to be awarded on Thursday, December 1 are:

Grand Prize -- $100,000

2nd Prize -- $10,000

3rd Prize -- $3,500

4th-18th Prizes -- $1,000

19th-27th Prizes -- $500

 

Raffle tickets are $100 each and are available online at www.ilcf.org and by mail at Illinois Conservation Foundation, One Natural Resources Way, Springfield, IL 62702-1271. 

 

The Illinois Conservation Foundation (ICF) – a 501 (c) (3) not for profit corporation – was established in 1994 to raise funds in support of programs of the Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR).  All ICF and raffle funds are held in private accounts. 


Illinois once again comes in last place on public safety

But comes in first place when it comes to politics

The officers, directors and members of the Illinois State Rifle Association are offering their congratulations to the good people of Wisconsin upon the passage of concealed carry legislation by the Wisconsin House of Representatives.  Passage of similar legislation earlier this month by the Wisconsin Senate along with Gov. Walker’s pledge to sign a concealed carry bill means that the law-abiding citizens of Wisconsin will finally be able to lawfully protect themselves and their families from violent criminals.

 

This good fortune enjoyed by the citizens of Wisconsin underscores the ongoing plight of their neighbors to the south.  Once the Wisconsin governor signs concealed carry into law, Illinois will be the only state in the nation that prohibits its citizens from protecting themselves with the most effective tool available – the defensive firearm.  As recently as May, the Illinois House had the opportunity to pass life-saving concealed carry legislation.  Unfortunately, a small but powerful contingent of Chicago lawmakers sabotaged the legislation, thus causing the bill to fall a half-dozen votes short of passage.

 

“A few members of the Illinois General Assembly have

taken it upon themselves to decide who is worth defending and who is not,” commented ISRA Executive Director, Richard Pearson.  “By voting concealed carry down, they are clearly siding with the bad guys while letting the good people of Illinois take it on the chin from murderers, robbers, rapists and the increasingly-popular flash-mobs.”

 

“This small band of legislative hold-outs believes that they can act with impunity,” continued Pearson.  “But, we have news for them.  The law abiding citizens of Illinois will fight tirelessly to recapture their right to self defense.  This battle will be waged relentlessly at the polls and in the courts.  Currently, there is a pair of federal lawsuits in the courts that address Illinois’ persistent denial of the law-abiding citizen’s right to self defense.  We expect a favorable outcome in the courts but, if these actions fail, it just means that more actions will follow.  Our determination on this matter is single-minded.  We will fight until we win – no matter how long it takes.”

 

“By now, Illinois is used to coming in last place in nearly every form of endeavor,” said Pearson.  “But one thing is for certain, Illinois comes in first place when it comes to placing politics before public safety.”    www.isra.org

 

 


Michigan

Great Lakes invasive species council proposed

LANSING, MI (AP) — Michigan Republican senators detailed a proposal Monday that would establish a Great Lakes regional council to help determine how to protect against aquatic invasive species.  The arrangement would be similar to a compact on water withdrawals created by the region's eight states and two Canadian provinces in 2005, said Sen. Howard Walker of Traverse City.

 

The proposed bill would create an aquatic invasive species advisory council with a panel of experts aimed at protecting the Great Lakes basin. The panel would work on a plan to prevent and monitor aquatic invasive species throughout the region.

 

The council would work with state departments and

agencies to update and implement Michigan's invasive species management plan. The council also would review state law to recommend strengthened protections.  "We cannot continue to deal with threats as they present themselves," Walker said in a statement. "We need a long-term and a short-term plan in place now."

 

The legislative package could be formally introduced this week.

 

Supporters said aquatic invasive species already have affected tourism, fishing and related activities in Michigan. The potential threat that's been getting the most publicity lately is the Asian carp, but many invaders already are present in the Great Lakes basin including quagga mussels and sea lampreys.


DNR hosts meetings for proposed Northern Lake Michigan Walleye guidelines

The Michigan DNR will host two public meetings in July to gather input on proposed walleye management guidelines for the Northern Lake Michigan Management Unit.

 

The draft walleye management guidelines will help direct future management of walleye fisheries in northern Lake Michigan and the lakes and rivers contained within the Lake Michigan basin of the Upper Peninsula. Establishing management guidelines allows the DNR to coordinate the purpose and direction of walleye management activities throughout the unit.

 

The proposed walleye management guidelines build on a foundation of previous public input by citizen committees and angling groups, and incorporate the latest in sound science regarding walleye management. Detailed information on the biology and management needs of walleye, as well as specific strategies and actions for future management of walleye populations and habitat can be found in the draft plan.

 

"Walleye management and stocking efforts underwent some major changes in the past few years, due to the discovery of viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS), a fatal infectious fish disease, in the Great Lakes region," said Jessica Mistak, fisheries supervisor of the DNR's Northern Lake Michigan Management Unit. "Walleye stocking in our inland lakes was put on hold until research on the disease

and its potential impact on our hatcheries could be completed. We've recently been given the go-ahead to resume stocking walleye in our inland lakes, and these guidelines will play an important role in how we move forward with walleye management in the Northern Lake Michigan Management Unit."

 

Interested parties are encouraged to attend upcoming public input meetings to review the draft guidelines and provide public comment. The dates, times and locations of the meetings are as follows:

► Wednesday, July 13, 6 to 7:30 p.m. (Eastern Time), Escanaba DNR Pocket Park, 2401 12th Ave. N., Escanaba

► Wednesday, July 20, 6 to 7:30 p.m. (Central Time), Dickinson County Library, 401 Iron Mountain St., Iron Mountain

 

For Draft guidelines: www.michigan.gov/fishpublicinput. Comments will be accepted through Aug. 3, 2011, and may be submitted by email to DNR-NLMMU-Walleye@michigan.gov, or regular mail to DNR Fisheries Div, 6833 US Highway 2, Gladstone, MI, 49837.

 

For more information on the proposed walleye management guidelines for the Northern Lake Michigan Management Unit, contact Jessica Mistak at 906-786-2351, ext. 127. More information about fisheries management in Michigan can be found online at www.michigan.gov/fishing.


DNR auction for State-Owned Land begins

The Michigan DNR announced that 45 parcels of state-owned land in six Michigan counties will be offered for sale by sealed-bid auction at www.michigan.gov/landforsale.

 

The parcels, located mainly in the Upper Peninsula and northern Lower Michigan including Alger, Chippewa, Delta, Gladwin, Mackinac and Schoolcraft counties, have been reviewed by the DNR and approved for sale as surplus land. 

 

These properties range in size from less than an acre to 120 acres. They vary in character from riverside and lakeside parcels to forested properties to a parcel within the city of Sault Ste. Marie adjacent to a golf course. A parcel with an existing communications tower and a property with Lake Michigan frontage are also being offered.

 

“This annual auction is part of the Department of Natural Resources’ long-term approach to land management,” said DNR Director Rodney Stokes. “We work very hard to find the right balance between ensuring ample opportunity for public recreational access to state lands, while also providing an easy way for individuals to buy land for their own personal use.”

 

Information on the auction and on other land available for purchase, including photos, property descriptions, terms and conditions and instructions to submit a bid, is available at www.michigan.gov/landforsale  by clicking on Land Auction.

 

Sealed bids must be postmarked by midnight on Aug. 8, and will be opened on Aug. 17.  There is a minimum bid for

each parcel.  Property information and bid forms are also

available upon request to the Real Estate Services Section, P.O. Box 30448, Lansing, MI 48909-7948 or by calling 517-241-2742.

 

Stokes said the DNR’s Land Consolidation Initiative, an ongoing review of state-owned land, gives the department the chance to look at properties that are outside the boundaries of state parks, forests, game areas and recreation areas to determine if they are surplus to management needs.

 

Proceeds from land sales are used to improve recreation opportunities for the public and to enhance management capabilities on existing state land. 

 

Any parcels not sold through the auction process are posted to the www.michigan.gov/landforsale website and offered for sale year-round. Currently, 140 properties, ranging in size from less than an acre to 200 acres, are available for purchase on the website on a first-come, first-served basis. The majority of these parcels are located in northern Lower Michigan and the Upper Peninsula, but there are also several properties for sale in the southeast and southwest Lower Peninsula. A number of properties are not easily accessible by the general public.

 

The state reserves aboriginal antiquities and may reserve mineral rights on the parcels being sold. The DNR recommends all purchasers do their own research as to suitability of the parcel for the purpose intended, and conduct a personal inspection of the desired parcels whenever possible. The DNR makes no representation or claim as to fitness for purpose, access, condition or restrictions.


DNR offers women’s salmon fishing weekend in U.P. Aug 12-14

Women interested in learning more about the sport of salmon fishing can now register for a Becoming an Outdoors-Woman Great Lakes salmon fishing workshop to be held on Lake Michigan in the Upper Peninsula Aug. 12-14.

 

“Salmon fishing on the Great Lakes requires some special knowledge and skills, but once mastered, it can be one of the most exciting fishing experiences Michigan has to offer,” said Upper Peninsula BOW chairwoman Sharon Pitz.

 

Participants in this advanced-level “Beyond BOW” salmon fishing workshop will leave from the Fairport Marina, located at the tip of the Garden Peninsula in Delta County, and will experience trolling for salmon in the waters of northern Lake Michigan. Guidance will be provided by several experienced salmon anglers.

The workshop will include multiple fishing trips departing from the marina, the first on Friday evening with others planned during the day Saturday and on Sunday morning. All fishing and safety equipment will be provided. However, all anglers will need a valid Michigan All-Species fishing license and should bring clothing and outerwear for a variety of weather conditions, including non-slip footwear. The $200 registration fee also includes two nights lodging and Saturday evening dinner.

 

Enrollment for this Beyond BOW workshop is limited to eight participants and the registration deadline is July 29. The registration form, maps and other event information can be found online at www.michigan.gov/bow. For more information, contact Sharon Pitz at 906-228-6561.

Michigan fishing licenses can be purchased online at www.mdnr-elicense.com, at DNR Operations Service Centers or at any authorized license vendor.

 

 


DNR completes walleye survey on Delta County's Ford River

The Michigan DNR has completed its first walleye spawning survey on the Ford River in Delta County.  The data gathered during the survey will aid in the future management of walleye populations in Bays de Noc and its tributaries by documenting walleye spawning migration patterns, age structure of spawners, presence of stocked versus naturally-reproduced walleyes, and the estimated size of the spawning population.

 

"This was our first survey of the Ford River, so it will set the benchmark for comparison with survey results from other rivers or future Ford River surveys," said DNR Fisheries Research Biologist Troy Zorn. "There has been concern among anglers on Bays de Noc that recent poaching activity severely impacted the spawning population of walleye in the bays. The good news, at least for the Ford River, is that we documented a number of large spawning walleyes and many smaller walleyes in the river this spring.

 

Though rough estimates gained from the surveys can only provide a snapshot of the spawning run for a single year, and the size of the run can vary several fold from year to year, a general idea of the health of the fishery can be obtained once several years’ data are compiled.

 

“Natural reproduction from walleye spawning runs in Green Bay tributaries is key to sustaining the walleye fishery in Bays de Noc and other waters,” Zorn said. “Maintaining healthy fish populations along the Lake Michigan shoreline

is a priority for us, the anglers, and the communities that rely on the economic boost that a strong fishery can provide.”

 

One factor of key interest to DNR fisheries researchers is the presence of invasive zebra and quagga mussels in Bays de Noc, and determining current and potential future impacts the mussels may have on the local walleye population. The mussels increase water clarity and can negatively impact forage fish populations, which in turn could significantly alter seasonal walleye movement and distribution patterns.

 

Zorn added that the information gathered through the Ford River survey – and other surveys completed on additional tributaries of Bays De Noc and Green Bay – will play an important role in guiding future river management, and in determining the influence of habitat characteristics, stocking, and other factors, on walleye spawning runs.

 

Similar spawning surveys have been performed for the first time in recent years on the Cedar, Menominee, Tahquamenon, Escanaba, Whitefish, Rapid and Manistique rivers. The spawning surveys typically last from two to four weeks, with DNR crews able to survey, on average, one river each spring.

 

For more information about the spring walleye spawning surveys, contact Troy Zorn at 906-249-1611. To learn more about fisheries management in Michigan, go online to www.michigan.gov/fisheries.


Wisconsin

New web feature makes it easy to find lake maps, amenities

MADISON -- A new "Find a Lake" feature on the Wisconsin DNR website gives boaters and anglers an easy way to find new waters to try out. Users can search for lakes by region, alphabetically by lake name, or by features like boat ramps, beaches and parks. They can get maps and detailed lake information, and learn about boat access, local boating ordinances, and other facilities.

 

Wisconsin Lakes Fast Facts

►Wisconsin has 15,081 documented lakes; about 40 % have been named and most lakes are smaller than 10 acres,

►Vilas County has the most lakes, 1,318, followed by Oneida County with more than 1,100; the world's greatest collection of kettle lakes,

►Lake Winnebago is the largest inland lake surface area -- 137,708 acres -- and the largest volume, 696 billion gallons,

►Mud Lake is by far the most common lake name, attached to 116 lakes, followed by Bass Lake with 82 and Long Lake with 59,

►Wisconsin ranks in the top 10 states for boating, based on boating sales. It ranks tenth with $292 million in sales,

Wisconsin Lakes Book, 2009 revision

 

 


WI Farmer gets six years for boat bombings

A Wisconsin farmer was sentenced to six years in prison, followed by three years of supervised release, for blowing up several charter fishing boats in a Kewaunee, Wis., marina.

 

Joseph Sloma, 47, of Denmark, endangered firefighters, risked killing anyone who might have been asleep onboard one of the boats and destroyed the livelihood of several people, all for no apparent reason, U.S. District Judge William Griesbach said. Sloma, a former charterboat captain, pleaded guilty to one count of committing arson to property used in interstate commerce — four charter fishing boats used on Lake Michigan, the Green Bay

Press-Gazette reported.

 

He admitted to setting off a pipe bomb on Sept. 27, 2009 that destroyed the four boats moored at Salmon Harbor Marina. As part of his plea agreement, Sloma admitted to having bombed and destroyed another charterboat about four months earlier at the same marina.

 

Sloma came to court with a check for $320,000 to pay required restitution, defense lawyer Chris Froelich told the court. Sloma sold his own 38-foot fishing boat just before he was charged and saved the money to help make restitution, Froelich said.

 


Other Breaking News Items

(Click on title or URL to read full article)

 

Taft testifies against Lake Erie water plan
Former Ohio Governor Bob Taft today joined Democrats and environmentalists in opposing a plan by his fellow Republicans to allow large amounts of water to be drained from Lake Erie without a permit.

 

Public hearings set on commercial trap fishing nets
A requirement that anglers trolling with downriggers on the Great Lakes carry wire cutters on board -- along with changes that commercial fishers must make -- are the topic of public hearings June 27 in Cleveland and Bayfield.

 

Owens protests boating policy
Forcing boaters to report to Canadian customs every time they venture into Canadian waters could cripple tourism on the St. Lawrence River, Rep. William L. Owens told the Canadian government Monday

 

Senators offer plan for invasive species compact
Three Michigan senators planned to introduce a package of bills Tuesday to create a council to prevent the spread of invasive species in the Great Lakes.

 

 

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