Week of February 15, 2010

World
Fishing beyond the Great Lakes
Hunting & Shooting Products/Issues
National

Regional

General

Illinois
Michigan
Minnesota
Ohio
Wisconsin
Other Breaking News Items

 

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World

Global warming snow job

The Washington Times Editorial February 11, 2010

Record snowfall illustrates the obvious: The global warming fraud is without equal in modern science.

 

The fundamental problems exposed about climate-change theory undermine the very basis of scientific inquiry. Huge numbers of researchers refuse to provide their data to other scientists. Some referenced data is found not to have existed. The U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 2007 report that global warming activists continually cite invented a large number of purported facts. Consider a few of the problems with the U.N. report that came to light over the past few weeks.

 

► The Himalayan glaciers were supposed to disappear as soon as 2035. The United Nations didn't base this hysteria on an academic study.  Instead, it relied on a news story that interviewed a single Indian glaciologist in 1999. Syed Hasnain, the glaciologist in question, says he was misquoted and provided no date to the reporter. The doomsday account was simply made up, and the United Nations never bothered to confirm the claim.

 

► Because of purported global warming, the world supposedly "suffered rapidly rising costs due to extreme weather-related events since the 1970s." The U.N. cited one unpublished study to prove this. When the research eventually was published in 2008 after the IPCC report was released, the authors backpedaled: "We find insufficient evidence to claim a statistical relationship between global temperature increase and catastrophe losses."

 

► Up to 40 percent of the Amazon rain forest was said to be at risk because of rising global temperatures. Again, the U.N. didn't cite any academic studies but merely one non-refereed

report authored by two non-scientists, one of whom worked for

the World Wildlife Fund, an activist organization.

 

► The U.N. dramatically claimed that 55 % of the Netherlands is below sea level when the accurate portion is 26 %.

 

Getting facts wrong and citing dubious sources isn't the worst of it. Rajendra K. Pachauri, the U.N.'s climate chief, remained silent when he knew information was false and denied he had been aware of the Himalayan glaciers error before the recent climate-change summit in Copenhagen, which made a big deal about this nonexistent crisis. He only grudgingly came partly clean when Pallava Bagla, a writer for the journal Science, pointed to e-mail correspondence from last autumn showing Mr. Pachauri already knew of the fraud.

 

Adolescent name-calling further exposes the weakness of the case for man-made global warming and how desperate the leaders of this cult are becoming. On Feb. 3, Mr. Pachauri defended the fudged IPCC report and slandered critics as "people who deny the link between smoking and cancer; they are people who say that asbestos is as good as talcum powder. I hope that they apply [asbestos] to their faces every day."  This nasty piece of work tries to redirect attention away from his phony science by blaming skepticism about climate change on "business interests" that "spread a lot of disinformation."

 

Man-made global warming theory isn't backed up by science; it's a hoax. The fact that the world has been asked to spend tens of trillions of dollars on global warming solutions without being able to evaluate the data upon which the claims were made should have been the first warning that something was seriously wrong. The public and world leaders have been sold expensive snake oil by charlatans like Mr.  Pachauri, It's time to admit its all baloney and move on.

 

Fishing beyond the Great Lakes

Angler Lands Vermont's New Record Walleye

Waterbury, VT--Vermont has the best walleye fishing in New England, and Richard Levesque's latest entry in Vermont's fish record program  underscores that point. Levesque shattered the previous state record for walleye on February

10, when he caught a walleye weighing 14.55 lbs. through the ice on Lake Champlain.   Levesque caught the big fish using a tip-up baited with a golden shiner. The walleye measured 32 ½" long and had a 20" girth.

 

 

 

Hunting & Shooting Products/Issues

S&W M&P9 Named "Best in Class" by Gun Tests Magazine

Smith & Wesson® Corp., the legendary 158-year old firearms maker, announced that the company's Military & Police (M&P) pistol was recently named "Best in Class" for 2009 by Gun Tests Magazine. At the end of each year, Gun Tests Magazine surveys the work of its testing staff to review those firearms endorsed by the magazine's testers. The "best of" selections are a mixture of the original Gun Tests evaluations and other information the editorial staff compiles throughout the year.

 

"One of the things that separates our awards from many others is that we don't accept advertising," said Timothy H. Cole, Gun Tests Publisher. "By doing this, consumers have confidence that our Best in Class selections are the result of head-to-head evaluations and that the outcomes aren't influenced by anything else."

 

During the magazine's evaluation of the M&P9 pistol, which was originally covered in the May 2009 issue, the test team was highly complimentary about the design and function of the polymer pistol. The evaluators cited that their first impression of the M&P9 was that it felt extremely comfortable in the hand, was well balanced and was pleasantly devoid of extraneous controls and levers.

 

Ray Ordorica, the magazine's senior technical editor, who was

 

the original author of the May 2009 article, was quoted saying "The M&P9 provided as our test gun came in a large case with

two different grip inserts to make the backstrap larger or smaller. We liked it as it was, so we left it alone. The sights were fixed, and excellent in all respects. With the M&P9, there will be no cut hands from stovepipe drills. Another nice touch (there were many) was the wavy cut of the slide to form the serrations for slide retraction. The matte-black slide was stainless, and the polymer grip was hefty enough that the gun didn't have a top-heavy feel even when empty."

 

Throughout 2009, the M&P Pistol Series delivered strong results in diverse market sectors. In the law enforcement division, the M&P pistol continued positive growth with several full-department conversions including the Detroit Police Department, North Carolina Highway Patrol, Raleigh Police Department, Tampa Police Department, Milwaukee Police Department, Albuquerque Police Department, Washington State Patrol along with multiple state agencies and sheriff departments. Currently, over 500 U.S. police departments have approved or adopted the M&P pistol for duty use. Likewise, the M&P pistol was used extensively and with great success in numerous national, state and local sanctioned shooting matches. Engineered to become the handgun of choice for global law enforcement and military personnel, the M&P pistol design is based on input from numerous law enforcement and military organizations. The M&P Pistol Series is available in both full-size and compact models and is chambered in 9mm, .357 SIG, .40 S&W and .45 ACP.

 

 

New M-Pro 7 Gun Oil LPX - Combat Ready

Lubricant Protectant with Cleaner

Overland Park, KS - M-Pro7 unveils its next generation technology in the new M-Pro7 Gun Oil LPX. More than just a gun oil, this product replaces all gun oils, cleaner-lubricant-protectants (commonly known as "CLPs") and dry lubes. M-Pro7 Gun Oil LPX provides the benefits of current lubricants while mitigating typical drawbacks such as evaporation, separation, gumming and toxic odor.

Most gun lubricants on the shelf today are formulated from decade-old technology.  M-Pro7 conducted extensive cross-industry research of recent lubrication advancements which led to a breakthrough: an innovation in blending synthetic oils, liquid molybdenum and polymers. The new LPX additive contains a component with the lowest known friction coefficient which means that it is slick as physically possible.

 

M-Pro7 Gun Oil LPX also contains a non-solvent based

cleaning agent. This new technology repels dust and dirt and

can be used as a "cleaner" to remove surface carbon in the field. M-Pro7 Gun Cleaner should be used for periodic deep cleaning and removal of embedded fouling.

 

M-Pro7 Gun Oil LPX is the only commercial product to pass the initial testing for the recently updated military weapons specification (MILSPEC) including the 900 hour humidity cabinet corrosion and 100 hour salt spray corrosion testing.

 

Unlike most military "CLPs" that are commercially available, consumers who buy M-Pro7 Gun Oil LPX get the same formula that is sold to the military. M-Pro7 Gun Oil LPX provides unparalleled protection against wear, humidity, moisture, (including salt water) and leaves a long-lasting film that repels dust and dirt. This film will not evaporate and is excellent for long-term storage.

 

Testing by the Environmental Protection Agency details that this oil technology biodegrades and demonstrated no ill health effects including inhalation, oral ingestion or skin.

 

M-Pro7 Gun Oil LPX is the next generation of lubricant-protectant with cleaner for advanced military and law enforcement style handheld and crew-served weaponry used in extreme environments.

 For more info: www.mpro7.com

 

National

Officials detail plan to handle Asian carp threat

WASHINGTON -- After a White House meeting christened the "carp summit," federal and state officials February 8 announced a multi-pronged attack with a $78.5 million price tag to prevent Asian carp, an invasive species, from establishing populations in Lake Michigan.

 

Nancy Sutley, the president's top environmental adviser, led the meeting at the request of the governors of Michigan and Wisconsin, who were on hand. Gov. Pat Quinn of Illinois was scheduled to attend, but cancelled his travel plans because of the winter weather and planned to take part by teleconference, said Marlena Jentz, a spokeswoman.

 

Officials this afternoon unveiled an Asian Carp Control Strategy Framework, which they characterized as "aggressive" and "unparalleled." It features more than 25 short-term and long-term actions funded by major spending, some of which officials said already is in the pipeline.

 

Asian carp are considered a major threat to the Great Lakes and its commercial and recreational fishing industry, which estimates call a $7 billion enterprise.

 

The new strategy calls for a multi-tiered defense of the Great Lakes to keep carp out which scientists try to develop biological controls to prevent the prolific, non-native fish from developing self-sustaining populations.

 

Officials said a priority is limiting the number of carp that enter Lake Michigan. Key containment measures include:

 

►Constructing and operating a third electric barrier on the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal at the cost of $10.5 million; two existing barriers are near Romeoville, Ill,

►Awarding a $13.2 million contract next month to construct concrete and chain-link fencing between the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal and the Des Plaines River. The aim is to prevent fish passing around electric barriers when flooding occurs.

►Opening Chicago's navigational locks less frequently to block carp movement and studying the feasibility and impact of permanent lock closure,

►Deploying larger field crews to conduct physical and sonar observation, electro-shocking and netting,

►Testing 120 water samples a week, twice the current number, for eDNA, which refers to environmental DNA showing trace amounts of carp,

►The feasibility study on potential closure of the locks will examine the effectiveness of lock operations in blocking carp movement, the risks and costs associated with closure, and alternative steps, officials said.

Dick Lanyon, executive director of the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago, said Monday that one aspect to the federal government's control plan could limit shipping and boating traffic through the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal to certain hours of the day or certain days of the week.

 

Officials haven't yet announced a schedule, Lanyon said, and don't yet know what impact this would have on cargo shipping and recreational boating in the Chicago area. The locks and dams would still be able to be opened in emergency situations to prevent flooding, Lanyon said.

 

Under normal operating conditions, Lanyon said, the navigational locks and dams remain closed until a ship or boat is approaching.

 

Michigan Attorney General Mike Cox, whose bid for a court order forcing immediate closure of the locks was rejected while his lawsuit against the state of Illinois goes forward, released this statement regarding a possible partial closing.

 

"We have yet to see an official proposal in response to our suit, but that sounds as logical as keeping criminals in jail four days a week and hoping the other three days go well," Cox said. "Michigan and the other states continue to demand an immediate, full-time closure of the locks and a plan to get to a permanent separation of the Mississippi River and Great Lakes basin. We have not seen such a plan from Illinois or the federal government."

 

In addition to Sutley, chair of the White House Council on Environmental Quality, the meeting also drew officials from the Army Corps of Engineers, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Interior Department and the Coast Guard.

 

One participant, Tom Strickland, the Interior Department's assistant secretary for fish and wildlife and parks, talking about Illinois, said in a statement: "We are providing immediate financial, technical and research assistance to the state for their Asian carp control efforts in South Chicago waterways, and will continue to do everything we can to keep carp out of Lake Michigan."

 

The federal strategy also outlined longer-term management techniques to curb the Asian carp threat.  Some $5 million will be spent on additional chemical treatments; $3 million to expand the commercial market for Asian carp in Illinois and elsewhere, with some proceeds from carp filets going to ecosystem restoration and invasive species prevention; and more than $1.5 million for new research.

 

Regional

Officials detail plan to handle Asian carp threat

WASHINGTON -- After a White House meeting christened the "carp summit," federal and state officials February 8 announced a multi-pronged attack with a $78.5 million price tag to prevent Asian carp, an invasive species, from establishing populations in Lake Michigan.

 

Nancy Sutley, the president's top environmental adviser, led the meeting at the request of the governors of Michigan and Wisconsin, who were on hand. Gov. Pat Quinn of Illinois was scheduled to attend, but cancelled his travel plans because of the winter weather and planned to take part by teleconference, said Marlena Jentz, a spokeswoman.

 

Officials this afternoon unveiled an Asian Carp Control Strategy Framework, which they characterized as "aggressive" and "unparalleled." It features more than 25 short-term and long-term actions funded by major spending, some of which officials said already is in the pipeline.

 

Asian carp are considered a major threat to the Great Lakes and its commercial and recreational fishing industry, which estimates call a $7 billion enterprise.

 

The new strategy calls for a multi-tiered defense of the Great Lakes to keep carp out which scientists try to develop biological controls to prevent the prolific, non-native fish from developing self-sustaining populations.

 

Officials said a priority is limiting the number of carp that enter Lake Michigan. Key containment measures include:

 

►Constructing and operating a third electric barrier on the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal at the cost of $10.5 million; two existing barriers are near Romeoville, Ill,

►Awarding a $13.2 million contract next month to construct concrete and chain-link fencing between the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal and the Des Plaines River. The aim is to prevent fish passing around electric barriers when flooding occurs.

►Opening Chicago's navigational locks less frequently to block carp movement and studying the feasibility and impact of permanent lock closure,

►Deploying larger field crews to conduct physical and sonar observation, electro-shocking and netting,

►Testing 120 water samples a week, twice the current number, for eDNA, which refers to environmental DNA showing trace amounts of carp,

►The feasibility study on potential closure of the locks will examine the effectiveness of lock operations in blocking carp movement, the risks and costs associated with closure, and alternative steps, officials said.

 

Dick Lanyon, executive director of the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago, said Monday that one aspect to the federal government's control plan could limit shipping and boating traffic through the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal to certain hours of the day or certain days of the week.

 

Officials haven't yet announced a schedule, Lanyon said, and don't yet know what impact this would have on cargo shipping and recreational boating in the Chicago area. The locks and dams would still be able to be opened in emergency situations to prevent flooding, Lanyon said.

 

Under normal operating conditions, Lanyon said, the navigational locks and dams remain closed until a ship or boat is approaching.

 

Michigan Attorney General Mike Cox, whose bid for a court order forcing immediate closure of the locks was rejected while his lawsuit against the state of Illinois goes forward, released this statement regarding a possible partial closing.

 

"We have yet to see an official proposal in response to our suit, but that sounds as logical as keeping criminals in jail four days a week and hoping the other three days go well," Cox said. "Michigan and the other states continue to demand an immediate, full-time closure of the locks and a plan to get to a permanent separation of the Mississippi River and Great Lakes basin. We have not seen such a plan from Illinois or the federal government."

 

In addition to Sutley, chair of the White House Council on Environmental Quality, the meeting also drew officials from the Army Corps of Engineers, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Interior Department and the Coast Guard.

 

One participant, Tom Strickland, the Interior Department's assistant secretary for fish and wildlife and parks, talking about Illinois, said in a statement: "We are providing immediate financial, technical and research assistance to the state for their Asian carp control efforts in South Chicago waterways, and will continue to do everything we can to keep carp out of Lake Michigan."

 

The federal strategy also outlined longer-term management techniques to curb the Asian carp threat.  Some $5 million will be spent on additional chemical treatments; $3 million to expand the commercial market for Asian carp in Illinois and elsewhere, with some proceeds from carp filets going to ecosystem restoration and invasive species prevention; and more than $1.5 million for new research.

 

States take another crack at Supreme Court

Michigan Attorney General Mike Cox has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to close the canal for a second time.  The court rejected the state’s original request in January.

 

Despite that ruling, some agencies – such as Michigan's Office of the Great Lakes — are pressing for closure.  “We

 

have called for the emergency action of closing and obviously

have not been successful to this point,” said Ken DeBeaussaert, director.  “We need to identify what our longer-term responses will be until we reach the point that we think is necessary of finally separating the systems so that we don’t have this passage of the problems of the Mississippi to the Great Lakes or vice versa,” he said.

Feds pass on surest solution to Asian carp advance

TRAVERSE CITY, MI (AP) -- With marauding Asian carp on the Great Lakes' doorstep, the federal government has crafted a $78.5 million  battle plan that offers no assurance of thwarting an invasion and doesn't use the most promising weapon available to fight it off.

 

The surest way to prevent the huge, hungry carp from gaining a foothold in the lakes and threatening their $7 billion fishing industry is to sever the link between Lake Michigan and the Mississippi River basin, created by engineers in Chicago more than a century ago. That apparently is easier said than done.

 

The strategy released by the Obama administration on February 9 agrees only to conduct a long-range study of that idea, which could take years.  The government refuses to shut down two navigational locks on Chicago waterways that could provide an easy pathway for the carp into the lakes, although it promises to consider opening them less often.  This, in spite of the fact the Great Lakes Fishery Commission, International Joint Commission, Great Lakes Sport Fishing Council and other agencies and conservation groups argue that “ecological separation” of the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal from the Mississippi River is the only effective solution and must be achieved immediately.

 

Instead, the plan outlines two dozen other steps, from strengthening an electric barrier designed to block the carp's advance to using nets or poisons to nab fish that make it through. That's an expensive gamble that may not keep enough carp out of the lakes to prevent an infestation.

 

The solution the Great Lakes Fishery Commission and anglers prefer -- cutting ties between the lakes and the Mississippi -- would mean reconfiguring some 70 miles of canals and rivers. That's a massive undertaking that could not happen quickly and is fervently opposed by barge operators who move millions of tons of commodities through the Chicago locks each year.

 

Bighead and silver carp -- both native to Asia -- have been migrating toward the lakes since escaping from Deep South fish ponds and sewage treatment plants in the 1970s. The biggest can reach 80 lbs and 4' long, consuming up to 40 % of their body weight daily in plankton, the base of the aquatic food chain. Once established in the lakes, the carp could starve out the prey fish on which popular species such as salmon and whitefish depend.

 

The carp have already infested parts of the Mississippi and Illinois rivers, driving away many native fish. Silver carp are known to hurtle from the water at the sound of passing motors and slam into boaters with bone-breaking force.

 

While scientists differ on whether the carp would thrive in the

Great Lakes, which are colder, deeper and ecologically

different than rivers, many say the risk is too great to take any chances.  "None of us know for certain what their impact would be," University of Notre Dame biologist David Lodge told a House subcommittee this week. "There's only one way to find out, and I don't think any of us want that."

 

Pulled in different directions by fishing and barge industries; and politicians in Illinois and those from the other Great Lakes states, the Obama administration says the only realistic approach is to confront the carp on multiple fronts instead of taking the bolder step of severing Lake Michigan from the Mississippi basin.

 

"We cannot fight biology with engineering alone," Cameron Davis, the Environmental Protection Agency's spokesman on the issue, told the congressional panel.   Yet the federal plan is heavy on technological innovations. Among them: barriers using sound, strobe lights and bubble curtains to repel carp  and biological controls to prevent them from reproducing. They're promising measures -- but still on the drawing board.

 

Environmentalists and Great Lakes governors outside of Illinois who want to close the Chicago locks claim it's the best short-term option. But it isn't a foolproof solution, as young carp might still be able to slip through the leaky structures. The Chicago waterways also have other access points to Lake Michigan.

 

Army Corps of Engineers officials are putting their faith in a two-tiered electric barrier in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal about 25 miles  from Lake Michigan, to which they will add a third section this year. It emits pulses to scare off the carp or knock them unconscious if they don't turn back. No carp have been found above the barrier, although biologists have detected their DNA in numerous spots past it and even within the lake itself.

 

"While we're all talking," Lodge said, "the fish are swimming."

 

That almost certainly means at least some carp have eluded the device and reached the lake. The government's plan aims to keep their number low enough to prevent them from breeding. The problem is that no one knows how many carp need to make it into the lake to establish a foothold that can't be turned back.

 

"This is a lot of money to pile into stopgap measures," said Phil Moy, a University of Wisconsin Sea Grant researcher and co-chair of the Chicago Waterway Barrier Advisory Committee (of which the Great Lakes Sport Fishing Council is a long time active member). "It may do some good in the short term, but in the long term it's not going to solve the problem of invasive species on both sides of the divide. Ecological separation has to happen for this to be successful."

 

General

NRA Women's Wilderness Escape Sept 23-Oct 1

NRA is hosting its 2nd annual Women's Wilderness Escape scheduled for September 23 - October 1, 2010 at the Whittington Center in Raton, New Mexico.

 

The cost of this nine-day retreat is $1,250 and is open to women 18 and older. Fee includes housing, food and all event activities.  Transportation is not provided.

 

No experience is necessary, and all firearms and ammunition are provided. Participants will learn to shoot rifle silhouette,

long range high power rifle, black powder rifle, pistol, trap, skeet, sporting clays and archery. Other activities include map reading, camping, survival training, game calling, hunter education and Native American history. Register now as space is limited!

 

To find out more about the Women's Wilderness Escape and read what some of our 2009 participants had to say about the event, go to: www.nrahq.org/women/wilderness_escape.asp, or Patty Zollman: (703) 267-1378, pzollman@nrahq.org.

 

 

Illinois

DNR making plans for more fish stocking in Rock River

Catfish among target species for 2010

STERLING, IL – The Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR) is developing plans to stock flathead catfish and channel catfish in the Rock River later this year as part of a continuing effort to speed the recovery of the river’s fishery in the aftermath of a June 2009 fish kill.

 

Tens of thousands of sport fish were lost in the Rock River fish kill event first reported on June 20-21, 2009.  At that time, dead fish were discovered in the Rock River in an area from two miles north of Grand Detour to 50 miles downstream at Prophetstown.

 

The IDNR stocked the river with smallmouth bass and northern pike last summer and channel catfish last fall in the aftermath of the fish kill.

 

“At a recent meeting of area anglers, we again heard loud and clear how important the Rock River fishery is to them and to all of those who enjoy fishing from throughout the region,” said Dan Sallee, regional administrator for the IDNR Division of

Fisheries. “The Rock River fishery is very important to the local anglers and to the communities along the river.  Although the fishery is expected to fully recover, the public would like to see all possible efforts made to speed this recovery.”

 

IDNR fisheries biologists this spring plan to collect and relocate up to 100 pairs of flathead catfish into areas of the Rock River that were affected by the fish kill.  At the same time, IDNR personnel will relocate pre-spawn channel catfish to the same area of the Rock River, and further supplement the channel catfish population by stocking small fish from state hatcheries.

 

“Individual female flathead catfish may lay 100,000 eggs or more.  If only one in 1,000 of these eggs survives and thrives, this stocking level would result in an increase of up to 10,000 flathead catfish in the population,” Sallee said.  “This number of spawning pairs should speed the recovery of the fish kill zone.  The channel catfish stocking will also be beneficial.”

 

Anglers with questions about the Rock River fishery, call District Fisheries Biologist Ken Clodfelter at 815/454-2759.

 

Michigan

AG General Cox holding town hall info sessions on Asian Carp

Each meeting will be attended by AG Cox and the respective member of Congress that represents the district of the hearing as follows:

Congressman Camp, Feb 17th, 11:00-12:00 - Great Lakes Maritime Academy, Traverse City

Congressman Upton, Feb 18th, 11:00-12:00 - Location in St. Joseph TBD

 

Congressman Ehlers, Feb 22nd, 10:00-11:00 - Gerald Ford Museum Auditorium, Grand Rapids

 

Additionally, Federal officials are holding a three-hour meeting Feb. 17 in Ypsilanti at the Ypsilanti Marriott at Eagle Crest, 1275 South Huron St. in Ypsilanti. It will also be streamed live on the web at http://epa.gov/greatlakes/live.  

 

For more info: Hurley, Rachel (AG) HurleyR@michigan.gov

Public meeting on Asian Carp control Feb. 17 in Ypsilanti, MI

CHICAGO - The International Joint Commission, in cooperation with the participating agencies listed below, is hosting a public meeting in Ypsilanti, MI, on Feb. 17 to discuss plans and get recommendations on Asian carp control efforts. This will be the second public meeting in the Great Lakes region.

 

Who: Senior representatives from

          International Joint Commission;

          U.S. Environmental Protection Agency;

          U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service;

          U.S. Army Corps of Engineers;

          U.S. Coast Guard;

          Great Lakes states, provinces, municipalities and tribes (invited);

          White House Council on Environmental Quality; and

 

Scientific experts

 

When: 3:00 – 6:00 p.m., Wednesday, Feb. 17

 

Where: Marriott Ann Arbor Ypsilanti at Eagle Crest

             1275 S. Huron

             Ypsilanti, MI 48197

 

The meeting also will be available via live web stream at: www.epa.gov/greatlakes/live.  

Those who cannot attend the meeting in person can submit questions on the Web site.

 

When available, the framework and a transcript of the meeting will be posted on www.asiancarp.org/regionalcoordination.  Comments on the framework may also be submitted online at the above Web site.

 

Sturgeon Spearing Season Ends Quickly on Black Lake

It took just 30 minutes into the second day of the season for anglers to harvest the five sturgeon quota from Black Lake, the Michigan DNRE said.  Spear fishermen took four fish during the first six-hour day of fishing.

 

This year, the DNRE changed the registration procedure, allowing open access to spearing instead of issuing a limited number of permits. DNRE personnel registered 255 anglers for Saturday’s opener and 169 on Sunday.  Successful anglers were required to register their fish immediately with the DNRE. The season was closed - and anglers still on the

 

ice were notified - when the fifth fish was taken Sunday morning.

 

The sturgeon taken ranged from 28 lbs to a 104 lb, 75" specimen. Four of the fish had previously been captured by DNRE and Michigan State University netting crews and marked with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags.

 

“The season worked out very well,” said DNRE fisheries biologist Tim Cwalinski. “We were able to allow a lot more participation and still protect the sturgeon population. We received nothing but positive comments from the public.

 

DNRE Reminds Anglers about Bait Restrictions

As Winter Fee Fishing Weekend approaches, the Department of Natural Resources and Environment reminds anglers that the use of salmon eggs or minnows for bait is restricted in some waters as part of a strategy to slow the spread of viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS).

 

Anglers who purchase spawn or minnows for bait should make sure it is certified as disease-free. Certified bait is widely available and can be used anywhere. Uncertified bait may only be used in waters with fish that have tested positive for VHS. Anglers who collect their own salmon eggs for bait from lakes Michigan, Huron or Erie or their tributaries can only

use them downstream from the first upstream barrier from the

lake. They may not be used on inland lakes.

 

VHS, a disease that causes fish to die from internal bleeding, has caused mortalities among a number of species of fish in Michigan. The disease has been found in Michigan’s waters of Lake Erie and Lake Huron. VHS has been found in Lake Michigan, but not in Michigan’s waters.

 

“There is no known treatment for VHS,” said DNRE Fish Production Manager Gary Whelan, who monitors fish diseases for the department.  “Our best defense against it is trying to prevent and slow its spread.”

Minnesota

Minnesota switching to new touch-screen terminal license system

Minnesotans who buy their hunting, fishing and other DNR licenses at retail outlets will soon do so via a new electronic licensing system.  Effective Feb. 18, DNR retail license sales will be available on new touch-screen terminals that allow sales clerks to be more efficient when inputting data and outputting licenses.

 

"Hunters, anglers and trappers alone account for about 3.3 million license transactions a year," said Steve Michaels, DNR License Center manager. "We are moving to new terminals to stay in step with advances in technology, data management, and customer service."

 

The DNR switched from hand-written licenses to electronic-generated licenses in 2000. This is the first major change in license sales and management equipment in 10 years. 

 

In addition to the new terminals:

►Later this year the transaction fee for resident licenses that do not require a registration tag and are purchased from the

 DNR's Web site will drop from $3.50 to 3 %of the cost of the

license, plus a $1 agent fee. The transaction fee for a resident annual fishing license, for example, will be only 54 cents. That's likely less than it would cost to drive to a license vendor.

► DNR licenses will continue to be available 24 hours a day by simply placing a toll-free call to 888-665-4236.

► Possessing a Minnesota driver's license or state of Minnesota identification card will be mandatory for adults age 21 or older to purchase a resident license. The only exception relates the Religious Freedom Act.

 

"Years ago we made license sales available by computer and phone," said Michaels. "Now we've reduced the fees for these transactions. Our strategy is to adapt to what the customer wants - and that's to have low-cost and convenient options."

 

The DNR does intend to reduce the number of terminals it distributes to license vendors from about 1,750 to 1,600. This reduction will generate about $1 million in savings over five years. The DNR will maintain an efficient distribution of terminals throughout the state.

 

 

Ohio

Ohio Adds Fish Attractors

MINERAL CITY, OH- Northeast Ohio has some of the best places to fish in the state. But, more often than not, finding fish on some of the larger lakes can be difficult due to the lack of structure. But, thanks to collaboration between the Ohio Division of Wildlife and the Mahoning County Green Team, anglers who fish Atwood Reservoir (Carroll/Tuscarawas counties) now have an area where fish may be concentrated.

 

Throughout the month of February, crews from the Division of Wildlife placed fish attractors consisting of recycled Christmas trees in Atwood Reservoir. In total, 178 structures were introduced into an area of the lake that would not normally attract fish. "Holiday trees make excellent fish attractors due to their complexity, and they should be fully working when our new crappie regulations come into effect on March 1." says Matt Wolfe, Fisheries Biologist who oversees this project for the Division of Wildlife.

 

The tree structures can be found at the following locations:

► 164 structures from N 40o 32' 21.7" / W 81o 15' 37.1" to N 40o 32' 24.9" / W 81o 15' 42.3"

 

► 14 structures underneath the handicap fishing pier located inside Atwood Lake Park (N 40o 32' 23.9" / W 81o 15' 45.7")

 

The map datum on your GPS unit should be set at NAD 83 to find the structures and the coordinates provided are in degrees, minutes, and seconds.

 

The goal of this project is to introduce 500 structures into the waters of Northeastern Ohio annually in order to recruit the next generation of anglers and retain the anglers who already enjoy the sport of fishing. These efforts came at minimal cost to the Division and its constituents since the used block were donated and the holiday trees were recycled through the Mahoning County Green Team www.greanteam.cc.  To view some pictures of the structure placements, please go to the Wildlife News Release page at www.wildohio.com.  Structure locations in other Northeast Ohio lakes can be found at the Northeast Ohio Fishing Prospects page at www.wildohio.com For all other inquiries, please contact the Wildlife District Three office in Akron at (330) 644-2293.

 

Eight individuals busted with 114 Charges

JACKSON, OH - A total of eight individuals have been issued 114 summonses for wildlife crimes following a two month investigation into an alleged local poaching ring. The seven suspects are accused of poaching deer and wild turkey in Jackson and Gallia counties according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) Division of Wildlife.

 

Wildlife officials were assisted by the Ohio State Highway Patrol, the Jackson County Sheriff's Office and the Gallia County Sheriff's Office last Saturday in executing four search warrants, four arrest warrants and issuing summonses. Officials seized white-tailed deer mounts and antlers, wild turkey parts, firearms and all-terrain vehicles.

 

Wildlife officials began investigation of the suspects as a

result of several complaints from local hunters and anonymous TIP's called into the "Turn In a Poacher" hotline (1800-POACHER).

 

An updated list of charges include:

 

Jackie W. Farley II, 33, of Thurman - (27 charges)

 Carl E. Perry, 55, of Thurman - (23 charges)

Carl A. Perry, 22, of Thurman- (two charges),

Michael E. Perry, 32, of Vinton - (31 charges),

Gary L. Duty, 60, of Bethel - Hunting without permission.

Terry L. Farley, 57 of Vinton - Possession of untagged deer parts.

Dan Young, 44 of Troy - Failure to temporary tag a deer.

Trevor S. Mullins, 20 of Vinton - (five charges).

 

Wisconsin

Attorney General resolved to continue Carp Fight

Further study and open locks is unacceptable

MADISON – Wisconsin Attorney General J.B. Van Hollen was given a report yesterday by a Wisconsin Department of Justice Assistant Attorney  General on the results of the Asian Carp Summit held this last Monday, February 8, 2010 in Washington D.C. with Governors from Great  Lakes states including Michigan and Wisconsin and White House officials. While Department of Justice attorneys are representing the State of Wisconsin in litigation pending before the United States Supreme Court that seeks to close Army Corps of Engineers and Chicago sanitary district waterways locks in Illinois to avoid the entry of Asian Carp into the Great Lakes, Van Hollen and other Attorney’s General currently in court regarding the matter were not invited to the summit.

 

Lawyers from the Wisconsin Department of Justice participated in a separate conference call with USDOJ Main Justice February 10 to hear a report of the proceedings.

 

Although Van Hollen and other state Attorney’s General have

 

demanded that the locks be closed to prevent the migration of Asian Carp into the Great Lakes, the plan revealed at the White House rejects this approach in favor of a plan that will merely reduce the amount of time that the locks remain open while further studying the matter.

 

“I am not moved that this is a solution at all. If this course of action is to be followed, there is little to stop the certain infestation and ruination of the Great Lakes by Asian Carp. Further study and open locks is unacceptable. I have instructed our team here at Justice that our participation in the litigation will continue. The Great Lakes are not a koi pond for six foot flying fish that eat half their body weight every day,” said Attorney General J.B. Van Hollen.

 

Attorney General Van Hollen and the Wisconsin Assembly authorized Wisconsin’s participation in an action now before the United States Supreme Court.  A renewed motion has been presented to the Court which seeks an immediate order to close their locks until a certain method can be arrived at to ensure no Asian Carp enter Lake Michigan. 

Boating safety classes beginning around state

MADISON – While Wisconsin lakes may still be locked solidly in ice, it’s not too early for people to start thinking about safe boating next summer: boating safety classes begin around the state in mid February, with courses running through summer.

 

“Most boating safety courses are held before the boating season begins, so people are ready to safely hit the water when nice weather arrives,” says Roy Zellmer, boating safety administrator for the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

 

A Wisconsin boating safety certification or out of state equivalent certification is required for anyone born on or after Jan. 1, 1989 to operate a power boat on Wisconsin waters.

 

“Tragically, the vast majority of boating accidents and fatalities on Wisconsin waters every year involve operators who have never taken a boating safety course,” Zellmer says. “In 2009 none of the 16 people killed in boating accidents in Wisconsin had taken a course; in 2008, 19 of the 20 people killed had not taken a course.

 

The boating safety course objectives include reducing the

potential for boat accidents, injuries and fatalities, reducing the potential for conflict between different types of boating activities and others on the water, and promoting safe, responsible, and ethical use of the environment and our resources.

 

While the certificate is required for certain age groups, Zellmer encourages people of all ages to take the class and receive a safety education completion certificate.

 

“The number of recreational boaters using Wisconsin's waterways continues to grow,” he says. “As our waterways become more crowded and the types of boats using the water become more varied, it is increasingly important for all boaters to become educated on safe boating techniques and laws. Boating safety course graduates can help ensure healthy, happy, and safe voyages for years to come.”

 

More information about boating safety, boating safety education courses, and a searchable directory of upcoming safety education courses is available on the DNR Web site.  FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT: Roy Zellmer – (608) 264-8970

 

 

Other Breaking News Items

New rules proposed for Anglers in Ohio

Several northwest Ohio fishing impoundments are among 16 statewide targeted for a 15" minimum size limit on walleye, sauger, and saugeye under a proposal before the Ohio Wildlife Council. The regional waters include Ferguson and Metzger reservoirs in Allen County, Findlay reservoirs No. 1 and No. 2 in Hancock County, and Indian Lake in Logan County.

 

Asian carp issue comes down to nature vs. jobs

For most Chicagoans, this whole Asian carp controversy has played like just another fish story, mildly amusing but exaggerated.  The Asian carp is suddenly looming as a very real threat -- to jobs. And as their situation becomes better understood, the community at large is about to realize it's on the front lines of one of the biggest environmental battles in years.

 

Indiana Sides With Illinois on Carp Issue

The State of Indiana is siding with Illinois against the closure of Chicago area locks and gates. Indiana Governor Mitch Daniels says in a letter to the Obama Administration that closing the lock system would worsen flooding in parts of his state.

 

New rules proposed for anglers in Ohio
Several NW Ohio fishing impoundments are among 16 statewide targeted for a 15" minimum size on walleye, sauger, and saugeye under a proposal before the Ohio Wildlife Council. The waters include Ferguson and Metzger reservoirs in Allen County, Findlay reservoirs No. 1 and No. 2 in Hancock County, and Indian Lake in Logan County.

 

EDITORIAL: Federal takeover of lakes looms
Like Asian carp and other invasive species, the White House has recently laid the groundwork for a federal takeover of the Great Lakes and its tributaries.

 

Asian carp negotiations with Justice Dept. getting us nowhere, Cox says
Attorney General Mike Cox said settlement discussions this afternoon with the U.S. Department of Justice on his lawsuit to temporarily close Chicago locks and permanently close the Chicago canal went nowhere.

 

Expert: Canal must close to stop Asian carp

Unless Congress or federal agencies decide to permanently wall off the infamous Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal from the Great Lakes, it will continue to be a superhighway for invasive species, warned David Lodge, director of the Center for Aquatic Conservation at the University of Notre Dame at a Congressional hearing Tuesday.

 

Federal takeover of lakes looms

In June, the White House created an Interagency Oceans & Great Lakes Policy Task Force whose statements, at the least, confuse the issue of state sovereignty and, at the worst, threaten it. In fact, the task force effectively authorizes the feds to take over jurisdiction of the region's fishing industry and …

 

Something’s fishy about federal plans to control Great Lakes invasion of carp

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- A federal plan designed to keep hordes of Asian carp from entering the Great Lakes includes catching and eating them, a sure sign the strategy is a recipe for disaster. For almost three decades, federal officials promised to deal with contaminated ballast from ocean freighters, yet invasive species are still arriving.

 

Witnesses at hearing agree carp pose danger

Rep. James Oberstar (D-Minn.) called Asian carp "a treacherous, dangerous species that we cannot allow to enter the lakes." Witnesses testifying in front of a House panel on water resources and the environment all agreed on that point. But they continue to disagree on what to do about it.

 

One broken water heater: $827,000

A heat-pump system installed at the French River Hatchery failed after little more than a week. A year later, no solution is in sight.  An $827,000 geothermal heating system at the hatchery near Duluth has been broken and inoperable since shortly after it was installed more than a year ago.

 

What's killing Minnesota's moose?
The bad news continues for Minnesota's moose. The population of the iconic animal in northeastern Minnesota has declined again, based on the latest aerial survey this winter by the Department of Natural Resources.

Michigan OKs grants for wind power research
The Michigan Public Service Commission has approved two grants totaling about $1.7 million for studying the development of offshore wind technologies in the state.

 

Illinois to step up fight against Asian carp
Fisheries biologists will begin another targeted removal of Asian carp from Chicago waterways next week, using nets, electrofishing and possibly another chemical poisoning to stop advancement of the invasive species into Lake Michigan.

 

Expert: Canal must close to stop Asian carp
Unless Congress or federal agencies decide to permanently wall off the infamous Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal from the Great Lakes, it will continue to be a superhighway for invasive species, a scientist warned at a Congressional hearing.

Lake Erie could freeze over entirely for first time in years
The power is running out on the Lake Erie snow machine. The lake is about 90 to 95 percent ice-covered, and more cold temperatures forecast could freeze the entire lake. The lake hasn't completely frozen over since the winter of 1995-96.

 

Pentwater council votes no on proposed wind farm
The Pentwater, Mich., village council voted unanimously to reject the Scandia/ Havgul Clean Energy wind farm project. The resolution voices the community's concerns for the introduction of projects of similar scope and location in Lake Michigan waters.

 

Granholm calls Obama carp plan weak
The Obama administration proposed Monday a $78.5 million plan to try to prevent the voracious Asian carp from getting into the Great Lakes, but Gov. Jennifer Granholm said it falls short of what's needed to protect the fragile ecosystem from another threat.

 

Henderson suing over Galloo OK
The town of Henderson is asking a judge to annul the town of Hounsfield Planning Board's site plan approval for the proposed Galloo Island Wind Farm. Council says site approval lacks environmental, public notice requirements.

 

Kids lose as NYC kills scouting

Today is the 100th birthday of the Boy Scouts of America. But the centennial will likely pass with little fan fare in New York City, where of one of America's largest youth organizations has become practically invisible -- a loss, especially, to the city's most needy youth.

 

Carp talks may miss bigger lake challenge - JSOnline

The governors who called for Monday's Asian Carp summit don't just want to talk about carp; they want the Obama administration to tackle the larger issue of invasive species in the Great Lakes, which have become an ecological stew teeming with at least 185 foreign organisms.

 

Feds' Asian carp plan all wet

Only government could come up with something as stupid as this: The new plan to keep Asian carp out of the Great Lakes is to close the Chicago Sanitary and Ship canal three or four days a week for the next couple of months

 

 

 

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Reproduction of any material by paid-up members of the GLSFC is encouraged but appropriate credit must be given. 

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